Juvenile migration of Japanese dace Pseudaspius hakonensis revealed in a tributary of Lake Biwa with seasonal changes in abundance and stable isotope ratios

Abstract

Migration patterns of Japanese dace Pseudaspius hakonensis in and around Lake Biwa, Japan are unknown, although fluvial–lacustrine life history has been known in most tributaries, the many mature individuals migrating upstream into tributaries in early spring. Field surveys and stable isotope analyses were used to clarify the migratory history of Japanese dace in the Ishida River, inflowing to Lake Biwa. In the field surveys, the number of young of the year (YOY) individuals caught per unit effort (CPUE) by hand net and casting net in the tributary and lake-shore area was calculated. The CPUE peaked from May to July, after the spawning season, thereafter decreasing rapidly, suggesting that YOY Japanese dace migrated downstream to Lake Biwa immediately after emerging, possibly due to the abundant food resources there. From September to November, the CPUE of YOY individuals increased in the lower reaches of the stream, although their stable nitrogen isotope values were variable, in some cases being similar to those recorded in the upper reaches and the lake-shore area. This suggests that some YOY individuals migrate upstream from the lake in autumn. In the present study, the juvenile migration pattern of fluvial–lacustrine Japanese dace in Lake Biwa was described using a CPUE survey and δ15N and δ13C analyses.

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Acknowledgements

We are grateful to Dr. A. Maruyama for technical assistance in the analysis. The sampling of Japanese dace was conducted with the permission of the Fisheries Management Office, Shiga Prefecture. We also thank Dr. G. S. Hardy (Ngunguru New Zealand) for critically reading the manuscript and help with English.

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Correspondence to Daisuke Ishizaki.

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Ishizaki, D., Nagata, T., Kikko, T. et al. Juvenile migration of Japanese dace Pseudaspius hakonensis revealed in a tributary of Lake Biwa with seasonal changes in abundance and stable isotope ratios. Ichthyol Res (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10228-021-00804-7

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Keywords

  • Japanese dace
  • Pseudaspius hakonensis
  • Fluvial–lacustrine type
  • Migration
  • Stable isotope analysis