Clinical and Experimental Nephrology

, Volume 22, Issue 3, pp 583–590 | Cite as

Novel semi-automated kidney volume measurements in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

  • Satoru Muto
  • Haruna Kawano
  • Shuji Isotani
  • Hisamitsu Ide
  • Shigeo Horie
Original article
  • 119 Downloads

Abstract

Background

We assessed the effectiveness and convenience of a novel semi-automatic kidney volume (KV) measuring high-speed 3D-image analysis system SYNAPSE VINCENT® (Fuji Medical Systems, Tokyo, Japan) for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) patients.

Methods

We developed a novel semi-automated KV measurement software for patients with ADPKD to be included in the imaging analysis software SYNAPSE VINCENT®. The software extracts renal regions using image recognition software and measures KV (VINCENT KV). The algorithm was designed to work with the manual designation of a long axis of a kidney including cysts. After using the software to assess the predictive accuracy of the VINCENT method, we performed an external validation study and compared accurate KV and ellipsoid KV based on geometric modeling by linear regression analysis and Bland–Altman analysis.

Results

Median eGFR was 46.9 ml/min/1.73 m2. Median accurate KV, Vincent KV and ellipsoid KV were 627.7, 619.4 ml (IQR 431.5–947.0) and 694.0 ml (IQR 488.1–1107.4), respectively. Compared with ellipsoid KV (r = 0.9504), Vincent KV correlated strongly with accurate KV (r = 0.9968), without systematic underestimation or overestimation (ellipsoid KV; 14.2 ± 22.0%, Vincent KV; − 0.6 ± 6.0%). There were no significant slice thickness-specific differences (p = 0.2980).

Conclusions

The VINCENT method is an accurate and convenient semi-automatic method to measure KV in patients with ADPKD compared with the conventional ellipsoid method.

Keywords

ADPKD Polycystic kidney disease Kidney volume Semi-automatic method Ellipsoid method 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This study was supported in part by Grant-in-Aid for Intractable Renal Diseases Research, Research on rare and intractable diseases, Health and Labour Sciences Research Grants from the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare of Japan. We are grateful to Kyoko Suzuki and Jun Masumoto (Fuji Medical Systems, Tokyo, Japan) for developing novel software SYNAPSE VINCENT® to measure KV in patients with ADPKD.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors have declared that no conflict of interest exists.

Ethical approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee at which the studies were conducted (IRB Approval number 16-033 and 16-188) and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Informed consent

Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

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Copyright information

© Japanese Society of Nephrology 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Satoru Muto
    • 1
    • 2
  • Haruna Kawano
    • 1
    • 2
  • Shuji Isotani
    • 1
  • Hisamitsu Ide
    • 3
  • Shigeo Horie
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Advanced Informatics for Genetic DiseaseJuntendo University, Graduate School of MedicineTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Department of UrologyJuntendo University, Graduate School of MedicineTokyoJapan
  3. 3.Department of UrologyTeikyo University School of MedicineTokyoJapan

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