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Techniques in Coloproctology

, Volume 22, Issue 4, pp 301–304 | Cite as

Preliminary experience with umbilical stoma in transumbilical single-port colorectal surgery

  • A. d’Alessandro
  • N. Kari
  • A. Alameh
  • N. Pasquier
  • A. Tarhini
  • B. Vinson Bonnet
  • R. Noun
  • E. Chouillard
Technical Note

Abstract

Background

The umbilicus, an embryological natural orifice, is increasingly used as the only access route during single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) for colorectal disease. As a part of some of these procedures, a temporary, diverting ostomy could be exteriorized through the umbilicus itself. Theoretical advantages include better preservation of the abdominal wall and potentially superior cosmetic results. The aim of the present study was to evaluate our preliminary experience in SILS colorectal resection with umbilical stoma (u-stoma).

Methods

We retrospectively reviewed all colorectal patients operated using SILS for benign or malignant disease at Paris Poissy Medical Center. Patients were selected for consideration of u-stoma with our stoma therapists.

Results

Between January 2010 and December 2016, 234 patients underwent colorectal SILS procedures. In 74 patients (31.6%), an ileostomy (n = 41) or a colostomy (n = 33) was fashioned. Of these, 20 (27% of all ostomies) were umbilical stomas. The 20 u-stoma patients, 10 men and 10 women, received either a loop ileostomy (n = 14) or an end (n = 4) or loop (n = 2) colostomy. The mean age was 52 years (range 29–81 years). There was no mortality. Operative stoma-related morbidity occurred in only 5% of patients (n = 1: ileal torsion volvulus). Median follow-up after stoma formation was 30 months (range 12–59 months). Adjustment to the stoma and quality of life were satisfactory as estimated by both the patient and the stoma therapist. All stomas were reversed. At a median follow-up of 27.5 months (range 7–55 months) after stoma reversal, two patients had reoperation for incisional hernia.

Conclusion

This preliminary experience showed that u-stoma is a feasible and safe alternative to more conventional ostomy after SILS.

Keywords

Stoma Umbilicus Single-port laparoscopy Colorectal surgery Cancer 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical approval

All the procedures performed in patients in this study were in accordance with the ethical standards of the POISSY/SAINT-GERMAIN-EN-EN-LAYE research committee as well as with the French research guidelines inspired from the Helsinki declaration including its latest amendments. The POISSY/SAINT-GERMAIN-EN-EN-LAYE review board as well as the Western Paris District research committee approved the documents.

Informed consent

The informed consent of all included patients was obtained.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. d’Alessandro
    • 1
  • N. Kari
    • 2
  • A. Alameh
    • 2
  • N. Pasquier
    • 1
  • A. Tarhini
    • 2
  • B. Vinson Bonnet
    • 1
  • R. Noun
    • 2
  • E. Chouillard
    • 1
  1. 1.Unit of Colorectal Surgery, Department of Digestive and Minimally Invasive SurgeryParis Poissy Medical CenterPoissyFrance
  2. 2.Department of General and Minimally Invasive Surgery, Hotel-Dieu de FranceUniversité Saint-JosephBeirutLebanon

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