Genetic and Morphological Characteristics in the Local Population of the Landlocked Salmon Oncorhynchus masou Originally Distributed in Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan

Abstract

Oncorhynchus masou, including subspecies of Oncorhynchus masou masou (yamame) and Oncorhynchus masou ishikawae (amago), is one of the salmonid groups impacted by human activity such as dam construction and release of non-native salmonids. In this study, we investigated the genetic structure of O. masou populations in the Sakawa and Sagami Rivers, Japan, by sequencing the mitochondrial control region. We hoped to identify genetically the O. masou populations specific to and originally native to Kanagawa Prefecture, where the two subspecies are thought to be present. The populations found in the upstream tributaries, where there has been no human impact and no upstream migration of fishes, were assumed to be descendants of the local O. masou populations in both river systems, and the morphological features seen here were similar to amago and yamame. However, both populations were genetically related to amago. In addition, only six haplotypes were detected in 315 individuals collected from 20 localities in the two river systems. Furthermore, haplotype diversity and nucleotide diversity of these populations were low, and high Fst values were observed. These results suggest that the population size is restricted and genetic diversity is decreasing in the O. masou populations of the Sakawa and Sagami Rivers.

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Correspondence to Shiro Itoi.

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Okabe, T., Suguro, N., Koito, T. et al. Genetic and Morphological Characteristics in the Local Population of the Landlocked Salmon Oncorhynchus masou Originally Distributed in Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan. Mar Biotechnol 22, 812–823 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10126-020-09975-2

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Keywords

  • Distribution boundary
  • Indigenous population
  • Mitochondrial DNA
  • Oncorhynchus masou
  • Salmonid fish