Gastric Cancer

, Volume 20, Issue 6, pp 1004–1009 | Cite as

Phase 1 study of sulfasalazine and cisplatin for patients with CD44v-positive gastric cancer refractory to cisplatin (EPOC1407)

  • Kohei Shitara
  • Toshihiko Doi
  • Osamu Nagano
  • Miki Fukutani
  • Hiromi Hasegawa
  • Shogo Nomura
  • Akihiro Sato
  • Takeshi Kuwata
  • Kai Asai
  • Yasuaki Einaga
  • Kenji Tsuchihashi
  • Kentaro Suina
  • Yusuke Maeda
  • Hideyuki Saya
  • Atsushi Ohtsu
Short Communication

Abstract

A previous dose-escalation study of sulfasalazine (SSZ), an inhibitor of cystine-glutamate exchange transporter xc (–), in the variant form of CD44 (CD44v)-positive cancer stem cells (CSCs) suggested that administration of SSZ induces the reduction of CD44v-positive cells and intracellular reduced glutathione (GSH) levels in patients with advanced gastric cancer (AGC). Here we report a study to evaluate SSZ in combination with cisplatin in patients with CD44v-expressing AGC refractory to cisplatin. SSZ was given by oral administration four times daily with 2 weeks on and 1 week off. Cisplatin at 60 mg/m2 was administered every 3 weeks. Of the 15 patients who underwent prescreening of CD44v expression, 8 patients were positive, and 7 patients were treated with the dose level of SSZ at 6 g/day. One patient experienced dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) as grade 3 anorexia. Although no other patients experienced DLT, 4 patients required dose interruption or reduction of SSZ; thus, we terminated further dose escalation. No patient achieved objective response, but 1 patient completed six cycles with stable disease for more than 4 months as well as reduction of intratumoral GSH level. The combination of SSZ plus cisplatin was manageable, although dose modification was frequently required during a short observational period.

Keywords

Cancer stem cell CD44v-positive Gastric cancer Sulfasalazine xCT 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This study was supported by a Health and Labor Sciences Research Grant from the Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare of Japan as well as by a Renovation Project of Early and Exploratory Clinical Trial Center, National Cancer Center, Research and Development Fund (24-A-1). The results have not been presented previously in any meeting.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflicts of interest

No financial and personal relationships with other people or organizations are involved.

Human rights statement

All procedures followed were in accordance with the ethical standards of the responsible committee on human experimentation (institutional and national) and with the Helsinki Declaration of 1964 and later versions.

Informed consent

Informed consent or a substitute for it was obtained from all patients for being included in the study.

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Copyright information

© The International Gastric Cancer Association and The Japanese Gastric Cancer Association 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kohei Shitara
    • 1
  • Toshihiko Doi
    • 1
  • Osamu Nagano
    • 2
  • Miki Fukutani
    • 3
  • Hiromi Hasegawa
    • 3
  • Shogo Nomura
    • 4
  • Akihiro Sato
    • 3
  • Takeshi Kuwata
    • 5
  • Kai Asai
    • 6
  • Yasuaki Einaga
    • 6
  • Kenji Tsuchihashi
    • 2
  • Kentaro Suina
    • 2
  • Yusuke Maeda
    • 2
  • Hideyuki Saya
    • 2
  • Atsushi Ohtsu
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal OncologyNational Cancer Center Hospital EastKashiwaJapan
  2. 2.Division of Gene Regulation, Institute for Advanced Medical Research, School of MedicineKeio UniversityShinjuku-KuJapan
  3. 3.Exploratory Oncology Research and Clinical Trial CenterNational Cancer Center Hospital EastKashiwaJapan
  4. 4.Biostatistics Division, Center for Research Administration and SupportNational Cancer Center Hospital EastKashiwaJapan
  5. 5.Division of Pathology, Research Center for Innovative OncologyNational Cancer Center Hospital EastKashiwaJapan
  6. 6.Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science and TechnologyKeio UniversityYokohamaJapan

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