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Cognition, Technology & Work

, Volume 20, Issue 1, pp 125–152 | Cite as

Patient visits in poorly developed territories: a case study with community health workers

  • Alessandro Jatobá
  • Hugo Cesar Bellas
  • Isabella Koster
  • Rodrigo Arcuri
  • Mario Cesar R. Vidal
  • Paulo Victor R. de Carvalho
Original Article
  • 108 Downloads

Abstract

In this paper, we study the effects of poor conditions of territories in patient visits performed by community health workers and the consequences to primary care policies. We carried a case study with community health workers in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, including ethnographic observations in two primary healthcare clinics. Moreover, we present an analysis of the collected data with the support of the function resonance analysis method and we point out relations between the findings and the execution of the primary healthcare policy in a systemic approach. Thus, our study highlights the impacts of work situations in the health assistance of poorly developed communities, indicating how community health workers cope with adverse conditions, and how such situations affect the effectiveness of primary care policies.

Keywords

Community health workers Primary health care Home visits 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We would like to thank the family health care professionals who participated in this study. This work was produced with support from the Brazilian National Council for Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq).

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Ltd., part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Fundação Oswaldo Cruz – FIOCRUZRio de JaneiroBrazil
  2. 2.Instituto Alberto Luiz Coimbra de Pós-Graduação e Pesquisa em Engenharia – COPPEUniversidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro – UFRJRio de JaneiroBrazil
  3. 3.Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear – IENComissão Nacional de Energia Nuclear, CNENRio de JaneiroBrazil

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