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Journal of Wood Science

, Volume 63, Issue 2, pp 147–153 | Cite as

Practical techniques for the vibration method with additional mass: effect of crossers’ position in longitudinal vibration

  • Yoshitaka Kubojima
  • Satomi Sonoda
  • Hideo Kato
Original article

Abstract

The effect of the crosser’s position used for piled lumber on longitudinal vibration was investigated. As a model case, specimens with and without a concentrated mass were compressed in their thickness direction at nodal and antinodal positions of longitudinal vibration, following which, longitudinal vibration tests were conducted. Density and Young’s modulus were unaffected by compression of the specimen at the nodal position but was affected by compression at the antinodal position. By placing crossers at the nodal positions, accurate density and Young’s modulus values can be determined using the vibration method with additional mass without the influence of weight of the upper lumber.

Keywords

Antinodal position Crosser Longitudinal vibration Nodal position Vibration method with additional mass 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This study was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number JP15K07522.

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Copyright information

© The Japan Wood Research Society 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Forestry and Forest Products Research InstituteTsukubaJapan
  2. 2.Toyama Prefectural AgriculturalForestry & Fisheries Research CenterImizuJapan

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