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Amino Acids

, Volume 40, Issue 4, pp 1151–1158 | Cite as

Halogenated aromatic amino acid 3,5-dibromo-d-tyrosine produces beneficial effects in experimental stroke and seizures

  • Wengang Cao
  • Alexander Glushakov
  • Hina P. Shah
  • Adam P. Mecca
  • Colin Sumners
  • Peng Shi
  • Christoph N. Seubert
  • Anatoly E. MartynyukEmail author
Original Article

Abstract

The effects of the halogenated aromatic amino acid 3,5-dibromo-d-tyrosine (3,5-DBr-d-Tyr) were studied in rat models of stroke and epileptic seizures caused by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) through respective intracerebral injection of endothelin-1 (ET-1) and intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of pentylenetetrazole (PTZ). 3,5-DBr-d-Tyr was administered as three bolus injections (30 or 90 mg/kg, i.p.) starting at 30, 90, and 180 min after ET-1 administration or as a single bolus (30 mg/kg, i.p.) 15 min prior to PTZ administration. Neurological deficits and infarct volume were estimated 3 days after ET-1 administration and seizure score was assessed during the first 20 min after PTZ administration. The safety of 3,5-DBr-d-Tyr was evaluated in control animals using telemetry to measure cardiovascular parameters and immunostaining to assess the level of activated caspase-3. 3,5-DBr-d-Tyr significantly improved neurological function and reduced infarct volume in the brain even when the treatment was initiated 3 h after the onset of MCAo. 3,5-DBr-d-Tyr significantly depressed PTZ-induced seizures. 3,5-DBr-d-Tyr did not cause significant changes in arterial blood pressure, heart rate and spontaneous locomotor activity, nor did it increase the number of activated caspase-3 positive cells in the brain. We conclude that 3,5-DBr-d-Tyr, by alleviating the deleterious effects of MCAo and PTZ in rats with no obvious intrinsic effects on cardiovascular parameters and neurodegeneration, exhibits promising potential as a novel therapeutic direction for stroke and seizures.

Keywords

Ischemic stroke 3,5-DBr-d-Tyr PTZ-caused seizures Arterial blood pressure Caspase-3 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We would like to thank Laura Bohatch and Loel Warsch for technical assistance. This work was supported by Grants NS060862 from the NIH, 08KB02 from the Florida Biomedical Research Program, by the University of Florida McKnight Brain Institute, JS Gravenstein MD Endowment, and I. Heermann Anesthesia Foundation, Inc.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wengang Cao
    • 1
  • Alexander Glushakov
    • 1
  • Hina P. Shah
    • 1
  • Adam P. Mecca
    • 2
  • Colin Sumners
    • 2
    • 3
  • Peng Shi
    • 2
  • Christoph N. Seubert
    • 1
  • Anatoly E. Martynyuk
    • 1
    • 3
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of AnesthesiologyUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA
  2. 2.Department of Physiology and Functional GenomicsUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA
  3. 3.McKnight Brain InstituteUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA

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