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Amino Acids

, Volume 35, Issue 2, pp 365–373 | Cite as

Prediction of mutations engineered by randomness in H5N1 hemagglutinins of influenza A virus

  • G. Wu
  • S. Yan
Article

Summary.

This is the continuation of our studies on the prediction of mutation engineered by randomness in proteins from influenza A virus. In our previous studies, we have demonstrated that randomness plays a role in engineering mutations because the measures of randomness in protein are different before and after mutations. Thus we built a cause-mutation relationship to count the mutation engineered by randomness, and conducted several concept-initiated studies to predict the mutations in proteins from influenza A virus, which demonstrated the possibility of prediction of mutations along this line of thought. On the other hand, these concept-initiated studies indicate the directions forwards the enhancement of predictability, of which we need to use the neural network instead of logistic regression that was used in those concept-initiated studies to enhance the predictability. In this proof-of-concept study, we attempt to apply the neural network to modeling the cause-mutation relationship to predict the possible mutation positions, and then we use the amino acid mutating probability to predict the would-be-mutated amino acids at predicted positions. The results confirm the possibility of use of internal cause-mutation relationship with neural network model to predict the mutation positions and use of amino acid mutating probability to predict the would-be-mutated amino acids.

Keywords: Amino acid – Hemagglutinin – Influenza – Mutation – Neural network 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Wu
    • 1
  • S. Yan
    • 1
  1. 1.Computational Mutation ProjectDreamSciTech ConsultingShenzhenChina

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