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Archives of Virology

, Volume 163, Issue 5, pp 1351–1355 | Cite as

Mutation of I176R in the E coding region weakens Japanese encephalitis virus neurovirulence, but not its growth rate in BHK-21 cells

  • Yuyong Zhou
  • Rui Wu
  • Qin Zhao
  • Yung-Fu Chang
  • Xintian Wen
  • Yao Feng
  • Xiaobo Huang
  • Yiping Wen
  • Qigui Yan
  • Yong Huang
  • Xiaoping Ma
  • Xinfeng Han
  • Sanjie Cao
Brief Report

Abstract

Previously, we isolated the Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) strain SCYA201201. In this study, we passed the SCYA201201 strain in Syrian baby hamster kidney (BHK-21) cells 120 times to obtain the SCYA201201-0901 strain, which exhibited an attenuated phenotype in mice. Comparison of SCYA201201-0901 amino acid sequences with those of other JEV strains revealed a single mutation, I176R, in the E coding region. Using reverse genetic technology, we provide evidence that this single E-I176R mutation does not affect virus growth in BHK-21 cells but significantly decreases JEV neurovirulence in mice. This study provides critical information for understanding the molecular mechanism of JEV attenuation.

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the National Program on Key Research Project of China (2016YFD0500403).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that there is no conflict of interest.

Ethical statement

All animal experiments were approved by the Committee of the Ethics on Animal Care and Experiments at Sichuan Agricultural University. All experimental procedures were carried out in accordance with the approved guidelines.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Austria, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yuyong Zhou
    • 1
    • 2
  • Rui Wu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Qin Zhao
    • 1
    • 2
    • 4
  • Yung-Fu Chang
    • 3
  • Xintian Wen
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yao Feng
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xiaobo Huang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yiping Wen
    • 1
    • 2
  • Qigui Yan
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yong Huang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xiaoping Ma
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xinfeng Han
    • 1
    • 2
  • Sanjie Cao
    • 1
    • 2
    • 4
  1. 1.Research Center of Swine Disease, College of Veterinary MedicineSichuan Agricultural UniversityChengduChina
  2. 2.Sichuan Science-Observation Experiment of Veterinary Drugs and Veterinary Diagnostic TechnologyMinistry of AgricultureChengduChina
  3. 3.Department of Population Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences, College of Veterinary MedicineCornell UniversityIthacaUSA
  4. 4.National Teaching and Experiment Center of AnimalSichuan Agricultural UniversityChengduChina

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