Spatial distribution of temperature trends and extremes over Maharashtra and Karnataka States of India

Abstract

Earth surface temperatures are changing worldwide together with the changes in the extreme temperatures. The present study investigates trends and variations of monthly maximum and minimum temperatures and their effects on seasonal fluctuations at different climatological stations of Maharashtra and Karnataka states of India. Trend analysis was performed on annual and seasonal mean maximum temperature (TMAX) and mean minimum temperature (TMIN) for the period 1969 to 2006. During the last 38 years, an increase in annual TMAX and TMIN has occurred. At most of the locations, the increase in TMAX was faster than the TMIN, resulting in an increase in diurnal temperature range. At the same time, annual mean temperature (TM) showed a significant increase over the study area. Percentiles were used to identify extreme temperature indices. An increase in occurrence of warm extremes was observed at southern locations, and cold extremes increased over the central and northeastern part of the study area. Occurrences of cold wave conditions have decreased rapidly compared to heat wave conditions.

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Acknowledgments

We would like to thank the India Meteorological Department for supplying the required data. We are grateful to the University Grants Commission (UGC), Delhi, for providing financial support to carry out this research. The authors also thank the anonymous reviewers for their comments and suggestions which helped in improving the quality of the manuscript.

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Correspondence to Amit G. Dhorde.

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Dhorde, A.G., Korade, M.S. & Dhorde, A.A. Spatial distribution of temperature trends and extremes over Maharashtra and Karnataka States of India. Theor Appl Climatol 130, 191–204 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00704-016-1876-9

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Keywords

  • Heat Wave
  • India Meteorological Department
  • Cold Wave
  • Cold Extreme
  • Positive Significant Trend