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Surgery Today

, Volume 47, Issue 4, pp 525–528 | Cite as

The intentional oblique transection double stapling technique in anterior resection for rectal cancer

  • Masafumi Kuramoto
  • Satoshi Ikeshima
  • Kenichiro Yamamoto
  • Keisuke Morita
  • Tomoyuki Uchihara
  • Rumi Itouyama
  • Shinichi Yoshimatsu
  • Shinya Shimada
  • Hideo Baba
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Abstract

The double stapling technique (DST) is an intestinal reconstruction technique that has been widely adopted in anterior resection (AR) for rectal cancer. However, anastomotic leakage (AL) after the operation remains a major concern for colorectal surgeons. The sharp-angled corner of the remnant rectum that is often created by the ordinary DST can be a risk factor for AL. We have developed a new method of performing intentional oblique transection DST (IOT-DST). Using this technique, the anal side of the rectum is intentionally obliquely transected with linear staplers, and the area of the sharp-angled edge is totally punched out with a circular stapler. Between September 2015 and March 2016, we used the IOT-DST technique in the treatment of 15 consecutive rectal cancer patients and experienced no anastomosis-related complications, including leakage and stenosis. IOT-DST is easy to use and less stressful to perform than other techniques. IOT-DST has the potential to become the standard technique for AR in rectal cancer surgery.

Keywords

Intentional oblique transection double stapling technique Anastomotic leakage Rectal cancer 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

All the procedures of this study were in compliance with the accepted ethical standards.

Conflict of interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest in association with the present study.

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Copyright information

© Springer Japan 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Masafumi Kuramoto
    • 1
  • Satoshi Ikeshima
    • 1
  • Kenichiro Yamamoto
    • 1
  • Keisuke Morita
    • 1
  • Tomoyuki Uchihara
    • 1
  • Rumi Itouyama
    • 1
  • Shinichi Yoshimatsu
    • 2
  • Shinya Shimada
    • 1
  • Hideo Baba
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Surgery, Kumamoto General HospitalJapan Community Health Care OrganizationKumamotoJapan
  2. 2.Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Kumamoto General HospitalJapan Community Health Care OrganizationKumamotoJapan
  3. 3.Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Graduate School of Medical SciencesKumamoto UniversityKumamotoJapan

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