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European Spine Journal

, Volume 27, Issue 2, pp 482–488 | Cite as

Lumbosacral stress and age may contribute to increased pelvic incidence: an analysis of 1625 adults

  • Hongda Bao
  • Barthelemy Liabaud
  • Jeffrey Varghese
  • Renaud Lafage
  • Bassel G. Diebo
  • Cyrus Jalai
  • Subaraman Ramchandran
  • Gregory Poorman
  • Thomas Errico
  • Feng Zhu
  • Themistocles Protopsaltis
  • Peter Passias
  • Aaron Buckland
  • Frank Schwab
  • Virginie Lafage
Original Article

Abstract

Purpose

While there is a consensus that pelvic incidence (PI) remains constant after skeletal maturity, recent reports argue that PI increases after 60 years. This study aims to investigate whether PI increases with age and to determine potential associated factors.

Methods

1510 patients with various spinal degenerative and deformity pathologies were enrolled, along with an additional 115 asymptomatic volunteers. Subjects were divided into six age subgroups with 10-year intervals.

Results

PI averaged 54.1° in all patients. PI was significantly higher in the 45–54-year age group than 35–44-year age group (55.8° vs. 49.7°). There were significant PI differences between genders after age 45. Linear regression revealed age, gender and malalignment as associated factors for increased PI with R 2 of 0.22 (p < 0.001).

Conclusions

PI is higher in female patients and in older patients, especially those over 45 years old. Spinal malalignment also may have a role in increased PI due to increased L5–S1 bending moment.

Keywords

Adult spinal deformity Pelvic incidence Sagittal alignment 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The manuscript submitted does not contain information about medical device(s)/drug(s).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

None of the authors has any potential conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hongda Bao
    • 1
    • 2
  • Barthelemy Liabaud
    • 2
  • Jeffrey Varghese
    • 2
  • Renaud Lafage
    • 2
  • Bassel G. Diebo
    • 2
  • Cyrus Jalai
    • 3
  • Subaraman Ramchandran
    • 3
  • Gregory Poorman
    • 3
  • Thomas Errico
    • 3
  • Feng Zhu
    • 4
  • Themistocles Protopsaltis
    • 3
  • Peter Passias
    • 3
  • Aaron Buckland
    • 3
  • Frank Schwab
    • 2
  • Virginie Lafage
    • 2
  1. 1.Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital, Nanjing UniversityNanjingChina
  2. 2.Hospital for Special SurgeryNew YorkUSA
  3. 3.Hospital for Joint Diseases at NYU Langone Medical CenterNew YorkUSA
  4. 4.The University of Hong Kong, Shenzhen HospitalShenzhenChina

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