Risk factors associated with the seroprevalence of caseous lymphadenitis in sheep

Abstract

This study aimed to determine the prevalence of caseous lymphadenitis (CLA) caused by Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis (C. Pseudotuberculosis) and its risk factors of sheep reared in four districts (Sherbin, Mansoura, Belkas, and Dekernes) in Dakahlia Governorate. A total of 346 sheep serum samples collected from the study area were examined against antibodies for C. Pseudotuberculosis infection using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The prevalence of C. Pseudotuberculosis infection was estimated at 73.98%. The highest prevalence was found among flocks reared in Sherbin (83.65%) followed by those in Mansoura (74.41%) and Belkas (65.47%). A multivariate logistic regression was used to identify risk factor associated with CLA, and the results showed a significant association between the infection and the raising of sheep in open flock not in a closed farms (P = 0.033; odds ratio “OR”: 1.84; 95% confidence interval “CI”: 1.05–3.88). Additionally, higher prevalence was found in herds that keep diseased animals (P = 0.047; OR: 1.98; 95% CI: 1.01–3.23) than those herds which discard diseased animals. The infection by C. Pseudotuberculosis was increased in old age animals than young age ones. On the contrary, gender, treatment, and contact with goats were not associated with the higher prevalence of CLA in sheep (P > 0.05). In summary, the present study determined a high seroprevalence of C. Pseudotuberculosis infection among sheep in Egypt. Farmers should avoid potential risk factors associated with CLA that include keeping diseased animals for breeding and prevent introduction of newly purchased animals from flock of unknown status of infection especially old animals and this may be useful to establish accurate preventive measures.

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Acknowledgements

The authors would like to express their thanks to staff members, Department of Animal Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine at Kafr Elsheikh University, Egypt, for their providing control sera samples used in the ELIZA in the current study. Also, the authors would like to thank Mr. Ahmed Abou Eleez, Sultan Albagami, for certified translation for English editing service of the manuscript.

Funding

This study is supported by the Ministry of Higher Education of Egypt (grant number is not available).

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Correspondence to Ahmed Magdy Selim.

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Selim, A.M., Atwa, S.M., El Gedawy, A.A. et al. Risk factors associated with the seroprevalence of caseous lymphadenitis in sheep. Comp Clin Pathol (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00580-021-03198-0

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Keywords

  • Sheep
  • Egypt
  • Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis
  • Serology
  • Risk factors