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Death from respiratory diseases and temperature in Shiraz, Iran (2006–2011)

Abstract

Some studies have suggested that the number of deaths increases as temperatures drops or rises above human thermal comfort zone. The present study was conducted to evaluate the relation between respiratory-related mortality and temperature in Shiraz, Iran. In this ecological study, data about the number of respiratory-related deaths sorted according to age and gender as well as average, minimum, and maximum ambient air temperatures during 2007–2011 were examined. The relationship between air temperature and respiratory-related deaths was calculated by crude and adjusted negative binomial regression analysis. It was adjusted for humidity, rainfall, wind speed and direction, and air pollutants including CO, NOx, PM10, SO2, O3, and THC. Spearman and Pearson correlations were also calculated between air temperature and respiratory-related deaths. The analysis was done using MINITAB16 and STATA 11. During this period, 2598 respiratory-related deaths occurred in Shiraz. The minimum number of respiratory-related deaths among all subjects happened in an average temperature of 25 °C. There was a significant inverse relationship between average temperature- and respiratory-related deaths among all subjects and women. There was also a significant inverse relationship between average temperature and respiratory-related deaths among all subjects, men and women in the next month. The results suggest that cold temperatures can increase the number of respiratory-related deaths and therefore policies to reduce mortality in cold weather, especially in patients with respiratory diseases should be implemented.

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Acknowledgments

We would like to thank the Research Deputy of Kerman University of Medical Sciences for funding this study. The ethic approval and grant number is 92-251.

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Correspondence to Narges Khanjani.

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Dadbakhsh, M., Khanjani, N., Bahrampour, A. et al. Death from respiratory diseases and temperature in Shiraz, Iran (2006–2011). Int J Biometeorol 61, 239–246 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00484-016-1206-z

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Keywords

  • Temperature
  • Respiratory death
  • Shiraz
  • Iran