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Table 1 Fixed effects of a GLMM explaining annual variation in moth abundance among the 57 moth species in relation to elevation as well as the length and ending of the previous season

From: Climate change-driven elevational changes among boreal nocturnal moths

ParameterEstimate (posterior mean)95% HPD credibility intervalNeff
Lower limitUpper limit
Intercept (elevation a)0.41− 0.761.554500
Elevation (b)− 0.10− 0.560.374288
Elevation (c)− 1.29− 1.73− 0.764400
Elevation (d)− 0.16− 0.760.374500
Season length2.62 × 10−38.7 × 10−54.75 × 10−34500
Season end8.35 × 10−4− 3.03 × 10−34.4 × 10−34716
Elevation (b) × season length1.87 × 10−5− 9.99 × 10−41.0 × 10−34500
Elevation (c) × season length− 2.61 × 10−4− 1.20 × 10−37.76 × 10−44500
Elevation (d) × season length− 2.58 × 10−3− 3.63 × 10−3− 1.40 × 10−34500
Elevation (b) × season end− 3.39 × 10−5− 1.53 × 10−31.51 × 10−33731
Elevation (c) × season end4.33 × 10−32.83 × 10−35.89 × 10−34500
Elevation (d) × season end− 6.67 × 10−4− 2.30 × 10−31.12 × 10−34500
  1. The model was parameterized so that the lowest elevation [a = 340–344 m a.s.l. (spruce-dominated coniferous forest)] forms the reference category to which the higher elevations [b = 360–366 m a.s.l (Scots pine-dominated coniferous forest), c = 385–418 m a.s.l. (mountain birch-dominated deciduous forest), d = 462–470 m a.s.l. (treeless tundra)] are compared. Random effects included individual traps (i.e., repeated measurements within a particular elevation zone) as well as random intercepts for year and species that was correlated with elevation (a continuous variable ranging 0–130 m)