First report of Cryptosporidium spp. infection and risk factors in black-boned goats and black-boned sheep in China

Abstract

Cryptosporidium is an opportunistic protozoan parasite that can inhabit in the gastrointestinal tract of various hosts. Cryptosporidium infection in black-boned goats and black-boned sheep may pose a threat to the survival and productivity, causing considerable economic losses to the livestock industry. However, it is yet to know whether black-boned goats and black-boned sheep in China are infected with Cryptosporidium. Thus, the objective of the present study was to investigate the prevalence and associated risk factors of Cryptosporidium infection in black-boned goats and black-boned sheep in Yunnan province, China. A total of 590 fecal samples were obtained from black-boned goats and black-boned sheep from five counties in Yunnan province, and the prevalence and species distribution of Cryptosporidium were determined by amplification of the 18S rDNA fragment using the nested PCR. The overall Cryptosporidium prevalence was 13.2% (78/590), with 18.0% (55/305) in black-boned goats and 8.1% (23/285) in black-boned sheep. The age and sampling site were identified as main factors that result in significant differences in Cryptosporidium prevalence. Three species, namely C. muris, C. xiaoi, and C. ubiquitum, were identified in black-boned goats and black-boned sheep in the present study, with C. muris (46/78) as the predominant species. This is the first report of Cryptosporidium infection in black-boned goats and black-boned sheep in China, and the findings will facilitate better understanding, prevention, and control of Cryptosporidium infection in black-boned goats and black-boned sheep in China.

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Funding

Project support was provided, in part, by the Agricultural Science and Technology Innovation Program (ASTIP) (Grant No. CAAS-ASTIP-2016-LVRI-03) and the Promotion Project of ESI Disciplines of Yunnan Agricultural University (Grant No. 2019YNAUESIMS03).

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Correspondence to Xing-Quan Zhu.

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The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

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The present study has been reviewed and approved by the Animal Administration and Ethics Committee of Lanzhou Veterinary Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences. Fecal samples were collected from the black-boned sheep and black-boned goats with the permission of the farm owners or managers, and all procedures were performed according to the requirements of Animal Ethics Procedures and Guidelines of the People’s Republic of China.

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Zhang, Z., Chen, D., Zou, Y. et al. First report of Cryptosporidium spp. infection and risk factors in black-boned goats and black-boned sheep in China. Parasitol Res (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00436-020-06781-6

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Keywords

  • Cryptosporidium
  • Black-boned goats
  • Black-boned sheep
  • Prevalence
  • 18S rDNA
  • China