Prevalence, genotypes, and risk factors of Enterocytozoon bieneusi in Asiatic black bear (Ursus thibetanus) in Yunnan Province, Southwestern China

  • Jie Wu
  • Jian-Qiang Han
  • Lian-Qin Shi
  • Yang Zou
  • Zhao Li
  • Jian-Fa Yang
  • Cui-Qin Huang
  • Feng-Cai Zou
Original Paper

Abstract

Microsporidiosis is an important zoonotic disease, even leading to severe diarrhea. However, no information about prevalence and genotypes of Enterocytozoon bieneusi infection in Asiatic black bears in southwestern China is available. The objectives of the present study were to investigate the prevalence of E. bieneusi and to characterize their genotypes using the nested PCR amplification of the internal transcribed spacer region of the ribosomal RNA gene cluster and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The overall prevalence of E. bieneusi was 19.75% (80/405) and the rate of E. bieneusi in Xishuangbanna (33.33%) was significantly higher than that in any other regions (Honghe, 17.65%; Dehong, 13.04%; Kunming, 0; P = 0.01). Sequence analysis revealed that 4 known genotypes (D, n = 2; SC02, n = 10; SC01, n = 5; and CHB1, n = 4) and 13 novel genotypes (designed MJ1–MJ13) were identified. When 17, 5, 14, and 34 sequences at loci MS1, MS3, MS4, and MS7 via MLST analyses, representing 4, 4, 5, and 10 genotypes, respectively, were completed, one multilocus genotype (MLG novel-ABB1) was identified. This is the first report of E. bieneusi in Asiatic black bear in Yunnan province, Southwestern China. The results indicated the potential zoonotic risk of this parasite through the Asiatic black bear in this region and provided foundation data for preventing and controlling E. bieneusi infection of many other animals and humans in these regions.

Keywords

Microsporidia Asiatic black bear (Ursus thibetanusZoonotic disease Multilocus sequence typing 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Project support was provided by the Fundamental Research Funds of Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences (grant nos. Y2016JC05 and 1610312017004) and the Fund of Key Laboratory of Fujian Province Livestock Epidemic Prevention and Control and Biological Technology (grant no. 2016KL01) and the Agricultural Science and Technology Innovation Program (ASTIP) (grant no. CAAS-ASTIP-2014-LVRI-03).

Compliance with ethical standards

Competing interests

The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jie Wu
    • 1
    • 3
  • Jian-Qiang Han
    • 2
  • Lian-Qin Shi
    • 1
  • Yang Zou
    • 3
  • Zhao Li
    • 1
  • Jian-Fa Yang
    • 1
  • Cui-Qin Huang
    • 4
  • Feng-Cai Zou
    • 1
  1. 1.College of Veterinary MedicineYunnan Agricultural UniversityKunmingPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Department of Animal ScienceYuxi Agricultural Vocation Technical CollegeYuxiPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.State Key Laboratory of Veterinary Etiological Biology, Key Laboratory of Veterinary Parasitology of Gansu Province, Lanzhou Veterinary Research InstituteChinese Academy of Agricultural SciencesLanzhouPeople’s Republic of China
  4. 4.The Key Laboratory of Fujian Animal Diseases Control Technology Development and Biotechnology CenterLongyan UniversityLongyanPeople’s Republic of China

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