Visual symptoms, Neck/shoulder problems and associated factors among surgeons performing Minimally Invasive Surgeries (MIS): A comprehensive survey

Abstract

Purpose

Minimally Invasive Surgery (MIS) is demanding on the musculoskeletal and visual systems. Prevalence, severity and association of neck/shoulder problems and visual symptoms were examined among MIS surgeons. The associations of workplace and individual factors with these symptoms independently and combined were also examined.

Methods

MIS surgeons completed a comprehensive online survey inclusive of 52 questions about individual and workplace physical factors, neck/shoulder problems and visual symptoms. Binary logistic regression models were conducted to determine the associations of the neck/shoulder problems, visual symptoms and combined symptoms with workplace and individual factors.

Results

290 surgeons completed the survey. Neck/shoulder problems and visual symptoms were reported by 31.0% and 29.0%, respectively, 15.5% reported both problems. The prevalence and severity of neck/shoulder problems and visual symptoms were significantly associated (p < 0.001). Several workplace and individual factors were associated with these symptoms (p ≤ 0.05).

Conclusions

Several factors in the workplace environment (temperature, asymmetrical weight bearing and forward head movement) and individual (being female and wearing vision correction glasses) were significantly associated with neck/shoulder problems and visual symptoms. Evaluation of different strategies to minimise the strain on the neck/shoulder region and the visual system is required.

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Acknowledgement

The first author is a recipient of the University of Queensland, Research Scholarship (UQRS), Australia.

Funding

This research did not receive any specific grant from funding agencies in the public, commercial, or not-for-profit sectors.

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Authors

Contributions

A.A., M.C., A.K. and V.J. did the study conception and design. A.A., M.C., A.K. and V.J. carried out acquisition of data. Analysis and interpretation of data have been done by A.A., M.C. and V.J. All authors were involved in drafting the article, revising it critically for important intellectual content, and have given final approval of the version to be published.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Ameer Alhusuny.

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Conflict of interest

Drs. Ameer Alhusuny, Margaret Cook, Akram Khalil and Venerina Johnston have no conflicts of interest or financial ties to disclose.

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Appendices

Appendix 1 Participant recruitment and response

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Appendix 2 Factors associated with neck/shoulder and vision symptoms among surgeons performing MIS

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Alhusuny, A., Cook, M., Khalil, A. et al. Visual symptoms, Neck/shoulder problems and associated factors among surgeons performing Minimally Invasive Surgeries (MIS): A comprehensive survey. Int Arch Occup Environ Health (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00420-020-01642-2

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Keywords

  • Neck/shoulder
  • Visual
  • Surgeon
  • MIS
  • Prevalence
  • Posture