Celiac disease does not influence markers of ovarian reserve in adolescent girls

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the study was to determine whether celiac disease affects ovarian reserve assessed by antral follicle counting, ovarian volume, and anti-müllerian hormone in adolescent patients.

Methods

This case–control multicenter trial was performed from January 1, 2017 to May 31, 2018 and included 45 girls. On days 2–5 of the menstrual cycle, measurements of serum follicle stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, estradiol, prolactin, and anti-müllerian hormone were performed. Antral follicle counts and ovarian volumes were determined on the same day.

Results

Evaluation was made of 21 (47.7%) celiac patients with a mean age of 15.8 ± 1.3 years, and 24 (52.3%) healthy control subjects with a mean age of 16.2 ± 1.2. There was no difference between the groups in respect of right and left ovarian volumes (p = 0.790 and p = 0.670, respectively). Serum levels of anti-müllerian hormone of the celiac patients and controls were found comparable [(3.7 ± 2.9 (0.5–12) and 3.6 ± 1.8 (1.2–8.1)] ng/mL, respectively, p = 0.915).

Conclusions

Celiac disease may not affect the ovarian reserve determined with established ovarian reserve markers including antral follicle counting, ovarian volume, and anti-müllerian hormone in adolescent patients.

Trial registration

ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT04024449

https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04024449

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Abbreviations

AMH:

Anti-müllerian hormone

AFCs:

Antral Follicle Counts

CD:

Celiac disease

E2:

Estradiol

FSH:

Follicle stimulating hormone

GFD:

Gluten-free diet

Kg:

Kilogram

LH:

Luteinizing hormone

Ml:

Milliliter

mIU:

Mili international unit

ng:

Nanogram

PRL:

Prolactin

pg:

Picogram

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Acknowledgements

We thank to Caroline J. Walker for English editing this paper.

Funding

The authors have not received to support our research.

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Affiliations

Authors

Contributions

CC: conceptualized and designed the study, collected data, drafted the initial manuscript, carried out the initial analyses, and reviewed and revised the manuscript. AC: conceptualized and designed the study, collected data, drafted the initial manuscript, carried out the initial analyses, and reviewed and revised the manuscript. HY: conceptualized and designed the study, collected data. SVE: conceptualized and designed the study, collected data. OD: drafted the initial manuscript, carried out the initial analyses, and reviewed and revised the manuscript.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Cihan Comba.

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Conflict of interest

All authors declare that we have no conflict of interest in connection with this paper. All authors approved the final manuscript as submitted and agreed to be accountable for all aspects of the work.

Informed consent

Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

Ethical approval

All procedures performed in the study were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

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Comba, C., Comba, A., Yılmaz, H. et al. Celiac disease does not influence markers of ovarian reserve in adolescent girls. Arch Gynecol Obstet (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00404-020-05666-4

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Keywords

  • Celiac disease
  • Anti-müllerian hormone
  • Adolescent
  • Follicle stimulating hormone
  • Antral follicle counts