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Acta Neuropathologica

, Volume 131, Issue 1, pp 151–154 | Cite as

Non-prion-type transmission in A53T α-synuclein transgenic mice: a normal component of spinal homogenates from naïve non-transgenic mice induces robust α-synuclein pathology

  • Amanda N. Sacino
  • Jacob I. Ayers
  • Mieu M. T. Brooks
  • Paramita Chakrabarty
  • Vincent J. HudsonIII
  • Jasie K. Howard
  • Todd E. Golde
  • Benoit I. Giasson
  • David R. Borchelt
Correspondence

The injection of tissue homogenates from diseased animals into naïve animals to induce a neurodegenerative phenotype is a feature that defines “prion-like” transmission. Several recent studies have demonstrated that transgenic mice expressing human A53T-α-synuclein (αS; Line M83), respond to injections of CNS tissue homogenates containing abundant αS pathology by accelerated onset of CNS pathology with concurrent accelerated motor impairment [1, 3, 4, 5, 9]. Homozygous line M83+/+ A53T αS mice naturally develop a severe motor phenotype between 8 and 16 months that is associated with the formation of αS inclusions in the spinal cord, brain stem, thalamus, periaqueductal gray, and motor cortex [2]. Hemizygous M83+/− mice do not begin to develop these phenotypes until 21 months or later [2], but disease can be induced earlier by injection of CNS homogenates from affected M83+/+ mice [5, 9]. Although purified αS protein fibrils can reproduce the effects seen with tissue homogenates [1, 3, 6...

Keywords

Motor Phenotype Intrahippocampal Injection Spinal Cord Homogenate Asymptomatic Mouse Accelerate Disease Onset 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was supported by NINDS R01-NS089622 (BG) and R01-NS092788 (DB).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The author(s) declare that they have no other competing interests.

Supplementary material

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Amanda N. Sacino
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jacob I. Ayers
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Mieu M. T. Brooks
    • 1
    • 2
  • Paramita Chakrabarty
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Vincent J. HudsonIII
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jasie K. Howard
    • 1
    • 2
  • Todd E. Golde
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Benoit I. Giasson
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • David R. Borchelt
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of NeuroscienceCollege of Medicine University of FloridaGainesvilleUSA
  2. 2.Center for Translational Research in Neurodegenerative DiseaseCollege of Medicine University of FloridaGainesvilleUSA
  3. 3.McKnight Brain InstituteCollege of Medicine University of FloridaGainesvilleUSA

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