Peculiarities of structure and dielectric relaxation in ferroelectric vinylidene fluoride-tetrafluoroethylene copolymer at different crystallization conditions

Abstract

Vinylidene fluoride (VDF)/tetrafluoroethylene (TFE) 94/6 copolymer films obtained by low-temperature crystallization from acetone solution and by melt-crystallization under high pressure were studied. As shown in the X-ray diffraction patterns, β- and γ- phases coexist in the sample crystallized from a solution. At melt-crystallization, a number of γ-crystals decrease and spherulitic supramolecular structure is formed. It is accompanied by a decrease of the amorphous phase density in the intra- and inter-spherulite regions, which leads to an increase in the glass transition temperature. Differential scanning calorimetry data indicate a smaller fraction of the amorphous phase for the sample crystallized from the melt. At the same time, the relaxation strength of the mobility in the amorphous phase in this sample is higher. This contradiction is explained by the increased ratio of isomers in planar zigzag conformation, as shown by IR spectroscopy.

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Data availability

The datasets generated during and/or analyzed during the current study are available from the corresponding author on reasonable request.

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Funding

The work was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (RFBR 18-03-00493).

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All authors contributed to the study conception and design. Material preparation, data collection, and analysis were performed by V.V. Kochervniskii, V.A. Astakhov, S.A. Bedin, I.A. Malyshkina, N.A. Shmakova, A.A. Korlyukov, M.I. Buzin, and V.V. Volkov. The first draft of the manuscript was written by V.V. Kochervniskii and all authors commented on previous versions of the manuscript. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

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Correspondence to V. V. Kochervniskii.

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Kochervniskii, V.V., Astakhov, V.A., Bedin, S.A. et al. Peculiarities of structure and dielectric relaxation in ferroelectric vinylidene fluoride-tetrafluoroethylene copolymer at different crystallization conditions. Colloid Polym Sci (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00396-020-04691-8

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Keywords

  • VDF/TFE copolymer
  • Crystallization
  • Dielectric relaxation