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Thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) copolymer networks for galantamine hydrobromide delivery

Abstract

Natural alkaloid galantamine is widely used for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease and various other memory impairments. Galantamine hydrobromide (GH) is available as fast-release tablets, extended-release capsules, and oral solution. However, oral delivery of GH can cause side effects, such as nausea, vomiting, and gastrointestinal disturbance. Transdermal delivery is one possible way to avoid such unwanted effects and is also patient friendly, especially for unconscious patients, patients with swallowing difficulties, and patients with mental disturbances. In this work, thermoresponsive copolymer networks based on poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) were studied as new platforms for potential transdermal GH delivery. Series of networks of varied structure and composition were synthesized and investigated by applying swelling kinetics and different spectroscopic and thermal methods. The network films were drug loaded in GH aqueous solution and main characteristics of the obtained GH delivery systems were evaluated. The GH release kinetic profiles in BS at 37 °C were established and discussed.

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Acknowledgments

The authors acknowledge Dr. Philip Ublekov for the XRD measurements and helpful discussion.

Funding

Part of this work is supported by the Bulgarian Ministry of Education and Science under the National Research Programme BioActiveMed: “Innovative Low-Toxic Bioactive Systems for Precision Medicine” (Grant D01-217/30.11.2018).

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Correspondence to Darinka Christova.

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Georgieva, D., Ivanova-Mileva, K., Ivanova, S. et al. Thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) copolymer networks for galantamine hydrobromide delivery. Colloid Polym Sci 298, 377–384 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00396-020-04621-8

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00396-020-04621-8

Keywords

  • Polymer networks
  • Thermoresponsive polymers
  • Galantamine hydrobromide
  • Drug release