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Does mistrust still linger? A bioethical perspective on colorectal cancer screening

  • Daryl Ramai
  • Denzil Etienne
  • Madhavi Reddy
Letter to the Editor
  • 57 Downloads

Dear Editor:

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of death in both men and women in the USA. Over 135,000 new cases of CRC are expected to occur annually where over 50,000 patients will die of the disease. Screening and prevention of CRC with stool testing or colonoscopy is cost effective and greatly reduces the risk of CRC and death. To this end, the National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable (NCCRT) and CDC’s Heathy People initiative aims to increase the rate of CRC screening to 80% by 2018 and 70% by 2020, respectively. As we approach colon cancer awareness month, I cannot help but ask the question “Are we there yet?”

For patients unwilling to undergo colonoscopy, alternative screening methods are available including the fecal immunochemical test (FIT). FIT delivers CRC screening in the privacy of a patient’s own home without needing to step into a hospital, particularly for individuals who avoid or are fearful of medical institutions. Despite this advantage, CRC screening...

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Division of Gastroenterology and HepatologyThe Brooklyn Hospital Center, Academic Affiliate of The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Clinical Affiliate of The Mount Sinai HospitalBrooklynUSA

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