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Spontaneous bone formation in a large craniectomy defect

Letter to the Editor

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

References

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    Gosain AK, Santoro TD, Song L-S, Capel CC, Sudhakar PV, Matloub HS (2003) Osteogenesis in calvarial defects: contribution of the dura, the pericranium, and the surrounding bone in adult versus infant animals. Plast Reconstr Surg 112(2):515–527CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
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    Frassanito P, Tamburrini G, Massimi L, Peraio S, Caldarelli M, Di Rocco C (2017) Problems of reconstructive cranioplasty after traumatic brain injury in children. Childs Nerv Syst 33(10):1759–1768.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s00381-017-3541-8 CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of NeurosurgeryNational Institute of Mental Health and NeurosciencesBangaloreIndia

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