Plant Cell Reports

, Volume 36, Issue 11, pp 1701–1706 | Cite as

Trichostatin A increases embryo and green plant regeneration in wheat

  • Fengying Jiang
  • Daria Ryabova
  • Jeremie Diedhiou
  • Pierre Hucl
  • Harpinder Randhawa
  • Elizabeth-France Marillia
  • Nora A. Foroud
  • Francois Eudes
  • Palak Kathiria
Original Article

Abstract

Key message

Chemical agents such as trichostatin A (TSA) can assist in optimization of doubled haploidy for rapid improvements in wheat germplasm and addressing recalcitrance issues in cell culture responses.

Abstract

In wheat, plant regeneration through microspore culture is an integral part of doubled haploid (DH) production. However, low response to tissue culture and genotype specificity are two major constraints in the broad deployment of this breeding tool. Recently, the structure of chromatin was shown to be linked with cell transitions during tissue culture. Specifically, repression of genes that are required for cell morphogenesis, through acetylation of histones, may play an important role in this process. Reduction of histone acetylation by chemical inhibition may increase tissue culture efficiency. Here, the role of trichostatin A (TSA) in inducing microspore-derived embryos was investigated in wheat. The optimal dose of TSA was determined for wheat cultivars and subsequently validated in F1 hybrids. A significant increase in the efficiency of DH production was observed in both cultivated varieties and F1 hybrids. Thus, the inclusion of TSA in DH protocols for wheat breeding programs is advocated.

Keywords

Trichostatin A Wheat microspore culture Embryogenesis Doubled-haploidy Plant regeneration 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We acknowledge Syngenta and KWS for providing wheat cultivars used in this study. We thank Western Grains Research Foundation for funding this research project. Activities related to F1 hybrids were co-funded by Alberta Innovates Biosolutions, Western Grains Research Foundation, Alberta Wheat Commission and the Alberta Crop Improvement Development Fund.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fengying Jiang
    • 1
  • Daria Ryabova
    • 1
  • Jeremie Diedhiou
    • 2
  • Pierre Hucl
    • 3
  • Harpinder Randhawa
    • 1
  • Elizabeth-France Marillia
    • 2
  • Nora A. Foroud
    • 1
  • Francois Eudes
    • 1
  • Palak Kathiria
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Agriculture and Agri-Food CanadaLethbridgeCanada
  2. 2.National Research Council CanadaSaskatoonCanada
  3. 3.Crop Development CentreUniversity of SaskatchewanSaskatoonCanada

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