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Polymer Bulletin

, Volume 76, Issue 2, pp 813–824 | Cite as

Controlled drug release behavior of 5-aminosalicylic acid using polyacrylamide grafted oatmeal (OAT-g-PAM): a pH-sensitive drug carrier

  • Srijita BhartiEmail author
  • Sumit Mishra
Original Paper
  • 53 Downloads

Abstract

In the present investigation, we have evaluated the in vitro drug release of 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) using polyacrylamide grafted oatmeal (OAT-g-PAM). The graft co-polymer was synthesized by following free radical co-polymerization pathway using acrylamide as a monomer and ceric ammonium nitrate as a free radical initiator in the presence of microwave. The matrix tablet was prepared using the different grades of developed graft co-polymers following standard protocol. In vitro release phenomena of 5-ASA from the prepared matrix tablet up to 12 h in different buffer solution, i.e., pH 2.0, 7.0 and 7.4, an ideal condition for colon specific drug delivery was studied. The release rate of 5-ASA can be controlled efficiently by tuning the pH value. The drug release kinetic of 5-ASA from different matrix tablet was evaluated on the basis of in vitro controlled drug release results. The result indicates that the novel pH-sensitive matrices under study showing Fickian diffusion mechanism and potentially constructive for colonic drug delivery system.

Keywords

Oatmeal Graft co-polymers Biopolymeric matrices Controlled and targeted drug release 5-ASA Drug release kinetics Fickian release behavior 

Notes

Acknowledgements

Authors deeply acknowledge the financial support received from Department of Science and Technology, New Delhi, India, in form of research grant (Letter No.: SR/FT/CS-113/2011 dated 29/06/2012).

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of ChemistryBirla Institute of TechnologyRanchiIndia

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