Physics and Chemistry of Minerals

, Volume 45, Issue 5, pp 423–434 | Cite as

Single crystal growth, characterization and high-pressure Raman spectroscopy of impurity-free magnesite (MgCO3)

  • Wen Liang
  • Zeming Li
  • Yuan Yin
  • Rui Li
  • Lin Chen
  • Yu He
  • Haini Dong
  • Lidong Dai
  • Heping Li
Original Paper
  • 138 Downloads

Abstract

The understanding of the physical and chemical properties of magnesite (MgCO3) under deep-mantle conditions is highly important to capture the essence of deep-carbon storage in Earth’s interior. To develop standard rating scales, the impurity-free magnesite single crystal, paying particular attention to the case of avoiding adverse impacts of Ca2+, Fe2+, and Mn2+ impurities in natural magnesite, is undoubtedly necessary for all research of magnesite, including crystalline structural phase transitions, anisotropic elasticity and conductivity, and equation of state (EoS). Thus, a high-quality single crystal of impurity-free magnesite was grown successfully for the first time using the self-flux method under high pressure–temperature conditions. The size of the magnesite single crystal, observed in a plane-polarized microscope, exceeds 200 μm, and the crystal exhibits a rhombohedral structure to cleave along the (101) plane. In addition, its composition of Mg0.999 ± 0.001CO3 was quantified through electron probing analysis. The structural property was investigated by means of single crystal X-ray diffraction and the unit cell dimensions obtained in the rhombohedral symmetry of the \(R\bar {3}c\) space group are a = 4.6255 (3) and c = 14.987 (2), and the final R = 0.0243 for 718 reflections. High-pressure Raman spectroscopy of the magnesite single crystal was performed up to 27 GPa at ambient temperature. All Raman active bands, ν i, without any splitting increased almost linearly with increasing pressure. In combination with the high-pressure Raman results \(\frac{{{\text{d}}{\nu _i}}}{{{\text{d}}P}}\) and the bulk modulus K T (103 GPa) reported from magnesite EoS studies, the mode Grüneisen parameters (1.49, 1.40, 0.26, and 0.27) of each vibration (T, L, ν 4, and ν 1) were calculated.

Keywords

Impurity-free magnesite single crystal growth Single crystal X-ray diffraction Raman spectroscopy High pressure 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We thank Dongzhou Zhang and another reviewer for their very helpful comments. We acknowledge Jun-fu Lin from University of Texas at Austin for constructive discussion in carbonate minerals, Zengsheng Li from the Testing Center of Shandong Bureau of China Metallurgy and Geology for composition analysis by electron probe, and Guowu Li and Lin Li from China University of Geosciences for experimental assistance in single crystal XRD. We thank Yong Meng and Jiali Cai from Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang, for his valued assistance. This work was financially supported by 135 Program of the Institute of Geochemistry (Y2ZZ041000), CAS, the Strategic Priority Research Program (B) of Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDB18000000), the National Key Research and Development Plan (2016YFC0600100), and Large-scale Scientific Apparatus Development Program (YZ200720), CAS.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wen Liang
    • 1
  • Zeming Li
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yuan Yin
    • 1
    • 2
  • Rui Li
    • 1
    • 2
  • Lin Chen
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yu He
    • 1
    • 3
  • Haini Dong
    • 1
    • 3
  • Lidong Dai
    • 1
  • Heping Li
    • 1
  1. 1.Key Laboratory of High temperature and High pressure Study of the Earth’s Interior, Institute of GeochemistryChinese Academy of SciencesGuiyangChina
  2. 2.University of Chinese Academy of SciencesBeijingChina
  3. 3.Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced ResearchShanghaiChina

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