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Pediatric Radiology

, Volume 27, Issue 4, pp 299–304 | Cite as

Imaging of arteriovenous malformation following stereotactic radiosurgery

  • Jeffrey V. Tranchida
  • Christopher J. Mehall
  • T. L. Slovis
  • Miguel Lis-Planells

Abstract

Background. Stereotactic radiosurgery allows for a high dose of focused radiation to be delivered to a small lesion such as an arteriovenous malformation (AVM). The clinical change and brain response over time to this localized high-dose radiation can be quite striking. Objective. The objective of this study to describe and analyse the imaging changes following radiotherapy for AVMs. Materials and methods. The clinical presentation and the imaging changes following radiotherapy in two patients were studied over the course of 1–2 years. Results. The imaging findings include diffuse low attenuation and contrast enhancement on CT. High-signal lesions were apparent on T2-weighted MR images with prominent contrast enhancement on T1-weighted images. Ring enhancement occurred over time. While new changes appeared over 12 months, these changes diminished during the second year. Conclusion. Radiotherapy induces inflammatory changes that are generally reversible but can lead to parenchymal destruction. These imaging changes are often nonspecific and therefore must be interpreted in light of clinical symptomatology and the time course since treatment. These patients should receive routine MR imaging within 3 months after radiosurgery with follow-up imaging at 6, 12, and 18 months.

Keywords

Contrast Enhancement Small Lesion Arteriovenous Malformation Brain Response Clinical Change 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jeffrey V. Tranchida
    • 1
  • Christopher J. Mehall
    • 1
  • T. L. Slovis
    • 1
  • Miguel Lis-Planells
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Pediatric Imaging, Children's Hospital of Michigan, 3901 Beaubien Boulevard, Detroit, MI 48201-2196, USAUS
  2. 2.Department of Neurosurgery, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, USAUS

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