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Heat and Mass Transfer

, Volume 54, Issue 11, pp 3427–3443 | Cite as

The effects of regeneration temperature of the desiccant wheel on the performance of desiccant cooling cycles for greenhouse thermally insulated

  • Amel Rjibi
  • Sami Kooli
  • Amenaallah Guizani
Original

Abstract

The use of solar energy for cooling greenhouses in the hot period in Mediterranean climate is an important issue. Desiccant evaporative cooling (DEC) system is advantageous because it uses a low grade thermal energy and preserves the merits to be friendly environmentally technology. In this paper, a numerical investigation was carried out on a desiccant cooling system powered by air solar collectors coupled to an insulated greenhouse. The influence of the regeneration temperature on the air stream properties at every system component state point was studied. The performance of the desiccant cooling system was evaluated in terms of thermal and electric coefficient of performance. Results show that the best performance of the system (COPel = 14 and COPth = 0.94) was obtained for a 60 °C regeneration temperature and a supply flow rate ratio of 0.2. An economic analysis shows that the use of the DEC system for greenhouse cooling is attractive and profitable since the payback period is 1 years. The use of the proposed system allows saving 9396 kWh/year of electric energy compared to conventional system.

Nomenclature

A

Heat transfer surface area (m2)

Ac

Collector area (m2)

As

Inside surface area (m2)

Ca

thermal capacitance of the zone air, J/K

COP

Coefficient of performance

Cac

Annual capital cost ($)

Co

Operation cost ($)

Cmain

Maintenance cost ($)

Ccc

Capital cost ($)

Cinv

Investment cost ($)

Ce

Unit charge for electricity

Cre

Energy consumption cost ($)

CSE

Saved energy cost ($)

Cp

Specific heat of air at constant pressure, J/(kgK)

d

Rate of interest

DEC

Desiccant evaporative cooling

F1, F2

Characteristic potentials

F'

Collector geometry efficiency factor

Fc

Capital factor

FR

Overall collector heat removal efficiency factor

h

Air enthalpy (kJ kg−1)

hc

Convective heat transfer coefficient

IG

Insulated greenhouse

IT

Global radiation incident on the solar collector (W/m2)

M

Moisture capacitance, kg

\( \dot{m} \)

Mass flow rate (kg h−1)

MJ

Mega joule

NTU

Number of transfer units

n

Rate of inflation

\( \dot{Q} \)

Heat rate (W)

\( \dot{q} \)

Heat flux (W/m2)

R

Resistance

Rf

Number of hours the fans are run each year

RH

Relative humidity (%)

T

Temperature (°C)

t

Time (h)

TRNSYS

Transient system simulation program

U

Overall heat transfer coefficient(W m−2 K−1)

UL

Collector overall heat loss coefficient (W m2 K)

\( \dot{V} \)

Volumetric flow of air (m3 h−1)

wf

Rated power consumption of fans

Subscripts

a

air

c

Cold

comb

Combined convective and radiative

coo

Cooling

el

Electrical

equiv

Equivalent

ev

Evaporative cooler

ex

Exchanger

ext

External

fsky

Fraction of the sky seen by the outside surface

h

Hot

in

Inlet

int

Internal

inf

Infiltration

max

Maximum

min

Minimum

ou

Outlet

pr

Process

reg

Regeneration

s

Surface

sky

Sky

star

Star

sup

Supply

surf

All surfaces

th

Thermal

ven

Ventilation

wb

Wet bulb

Greek symbols

ρ

Density (kg m−3)

(ατ)

Product of the cover transmittance and the absorber absorptance

σ

Stefan –Boltzmann constant 5.67 10‐8 W/(m2K2)

ε

Effectiveness

εF1 and εF2

Effectiveness parameters based on variations in F1 and F2

η

Collector efficiency

γ

Water latent heat of vaporization, J/kg

ω

Humidity ratio

Notes

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Research and Technology Center of Energy, Thermal Processes LaboratoryHammam LifTunisTunisia

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