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Marine Biology

, Volume 136, Issue 1, pp 149–157 | Cite as

Population structure of the giant tiger prawn Penaeus monodon in Australian waters, determined using microsatellite markers

  • A. L. Brooker
  • J. A. H. Benzie
  • D. Blair
  • J.-J. Versini
Article

Abstract

 We describe three highly polymorphic microsatellite loci which have been isolated from the giant tiger prawn Penaeus monodon. The number of alleles present among 312 samples at the loci Pmo9, Pmo25 and Pmo27 were 84, 34 and 35, respectively, with heterozygosities all >90%. Analyses of the distribution of length variation at three microsatellite loci among five Australian P. monodon populations revealed strong differentiation between populations from the west and those from the northern and eastern coasts. Tests for population differentiation (F st) values and an analogous measure for microsatellite loci (R st) all demonstrated that Western Australian P. monodon are a separate genetic stock which exhibits reduced genetic variation relative to the other populations. Reduced variability is consistent with a recent population bottleneck or colonization by a small founding population from the east when sea links between Indonesia, New Guinea and Australia were re-established following the last ice age. The results of this study are in agreement with previous surveys of P. monodon conducted with allozymes and mtDNA.

Keywords

Population Structure Microsatellite Marker Microsatellite Locus Indonesia Length Variation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. L. Brooker
    • 1
  • J. A. H. Benzie
    • 1
  • D. Blair
    • 2
  • J.-J. Versini
    • 3
  1. 1.Austrailan Institute of Marine Science and Cooperative Research Centre for Aquaculture, P.M.B. No. 3, Townsville M.C., Queensland 4810, AustraliaAU
  2. 2.Department of Zoology and Tropical Ecology, James Cook University, Douglas Campus, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia Fax: 0061 (0)7 4725 1570 e-mail: Amanda.Brooker@jcu.edu.auAU
  3. 3.Laboratoire Génome et Populations C.N.R.S. and Université de Montpellier II, Station Méditerranéenne de I'Environnement Littoral, Quai de la Daurade, F-34200 Sète, FranceFR

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