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Marine Biology

, Volume 160, Issue 10, pp 2671–2685 | Cite as

Composition of green turtle feeding aggregations along the Japanese archipelago: implications for changes in composition with current flow

  • Hideaki NishizawaEmail author
  • Yuta Naito
  • Hiroyuki Suganuma
  • Osamu Abe
  • Junichi Okuyama
  • Koichi Hirate
  • Shinichi Tanaka
  • Emi Inoguchi
  • Koji Narushima
  • Kiyoshige Kobayashi
  • Hisakazu Ishii
  • Shigeo Tanizaki
  • Masato Kobayashi
  • Akira Goto
  • Nobuaki Arai
Original Paper

Abstract

In order to develop effective conservation strategies for endangered migratory species, the link between feeding and breeding grounds needs to be clarified. In this study, the genetic compositions of consecutive Japanese feeding aggregations of green turtles (Chelonia mydas) along the Kuroshio Current were examined by mixed-stock analyses of mitochondrial DNA control-region sequences. The results indicated that the southern feeding aggregation around Yaeyama (24.3°N, 124.0°E) was sourced from various Pacific rookeries in the Yaeyama, Ogasawara, Western Pacific, and Indian Oceans and Southeast Asia. Among northern feeding aggregations, the Ginoza (26.5°N, 128.0°E) aggregation was also sourced from the Western Pacific Ocean, but the Nomaike (31.4°N, 130.1°E), Muroto (33.2°N, 134.2°E), and Kanto (35.6°N, 140.5°E) aggregations were contributed mostly by the closer Ogasawara rookeries. The reduced contribution from tropical Pacific rookeries to northern feeding aggregations and the significant correlation between genetic differentiation and geographical distance matrices of feeding aggregations indicated that most hatchlings from these regions transported by the Kuroshio Current settle in upstream feeding grounds along the Japanese archipelago, implying that current flow influences the composition of feeding aggregations. Differences in the composition of relatively close neritic feeding aggregations have important conservation implications, for which both regional and multinational conservation strategies are needed.

Keywords

Markov Chain Monte Carlo Haplotype Frequency Green Turtle Kuroshio Current Feeding Ground 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

We would like to acknowledge the followings for providing information about the stranded turtles on Ishigaki Island and field sampling assistance in Yaeyama Islands: the member of the Ishigaki Island Sea Turtle Research Group; K. Okuzawa and the staff of the Ishigaki Tropical Station and Yaeyama Station, Seikai National Fisheries Research Institute; D. Imakita (Faculty of Agriculture, Kinki University); and Y. Kawabata, T. Yasuda, K. Ichikawa, and H. Watanabe (Graduate School of Informatics, Kyoto University). The staff of the Ogasawara Marine Center and fisheries cooperative associations in Hahajima Island and Chichijima Island and M. Kaneko (Club Noah Hahajima) kindly helped with sampling in Ogasawara Islands. Sampling in Ginoza was supported by N. Kamezaki and the Sea Turtle Association of Japan. M. Kinoshita, H. Sawada (Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University), R. Matsuoka, and T. Nishizawa (IREIIMS, Tokyo Women’s Medical University) provided assistance with the DNA extraction, amplification, and sequencing analyses. T. Hamabata and H. Koike (Graduate School of Social and Cultural Studies, Kyushu University) kindly provided data on the Muroto and Nomaike aggregations. We thank the two anonymous reviewers for valuable comments on this manuscript. This study was partly supported by a Grant-in-Aid for JSPS Fellows (J.O. 17-1976), for Research Activity Start-up (J.O. No. 19880017), for Young Scientists B (J.O. No. 22710236), and the Global COE Program, Informatics Education and Research for a Knowledge–Circulating Society.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hideaki Nishizawa
    • 1
    Email author
  • Yuta Naito
    • 3
  • Hiroyuki Suganuma
    • 4
  • Osamu Abe
    • 5
    • 6
  • Junichi Okuyama
    • 1
    • 2
  • Koichi Hirate
    • 7
  • Shinichi Tanaka
    • 4
  • Emi Inoguchi
    • 4
  • Koji Narushima
    • 4
  • Kiyoshige Kobayashi
    • 8
  • Hisakazu Ishii
    • 9
  • Shigeo Tanizaki
    • 9
  • Masato Kobayashi
    • 5
  • Akira Goto
    • 3
  • Nobuaki Arai
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Social Informatics, Graduate School of InformaticsKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan
  2. 2.Protected Resource Division, Southwest Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Fisheries ServiceNational Oceanic and Atmospheric AdministrationLa JollaUSA
  3. 3.Laboratory of Breeding Science, Graduate School of Fisheries SciencesHokkaido UniversityHakodateJapan
  4. 4.Everlasting Nature of AsiaYokohamaJapan
  5. 5.Research Center for Subtropical Fisheries, Seikai National Fisheries Research InstituteFisheries Research AgencyIshigakiJapan
  6. 6.National Research Institute of Far Seas FisheriesFisheries Research AgencyShimizuJapan
  7. 7.Okinawa Prefectural Fisheries and Ocean Research CenterItomanJapan
  8. 8.Program in Environmental Management, Graduate School of AgricultureKinki UniversityNaraJapan
  9. 9.Ishigaki Island Sea Turtle Research GroupIshigakiJapan

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