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Direct laser photo-induced fluorescence determination of bisphenol A

Abstract

Classical photo-induced fluorescence methods are conducted in two steps: a UV irradiation step in order to form a photo-induced compound followed by its fluorimetric determination. Automated flow injection methods are frequently used for these analyses. In this work, we propose a new method of direct laser photo-induced fluorescence analysis. This new method is based on direct irradiation of the analyte in a fluorimetric cell in order to form a photo-induced fluorescent compound and its direct fluorimetric detection during a short irradiation time. Irradiation is performed with a tuneable Nd:YAG laser to select the optimal excitation wavelength and to improve the specificity. It has been applied to the determination of bisphenol A, an endocrine disrupter compound that may be a potential contaminant for food. Irradiation of bisphenol A at 230 nm produces a photo-induced compound with a much higher fluorescence quantum yield and specific excitation/emission wavelengths. In tap water, the fluorescence of bisphenol A increases linearly versus its concentration and, its determination by direct laser photo-induced fluorescence permits to obtain a low limit of detection of 17 μg L−1.

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Correspondence to Philippe Giamarchi.

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Maroto, A., Kissingou, P., Diascorn, A. et al. Direct laser photo-induced fluorescence determination of bisphenol A. Anal Bioanal Chem 401, 3011 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00216-011-5375-7

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00216-011-5375-7

Keywords

  • Fluorescence/luminescence
  • Laser spectroscopy
  • Organic compounds/trace organic compounds
  • Pesticides/endocrine disruptors
  • Spectroscopy/instrumentation
  • Water