Adhesion and colonization of potential probiont Pseudomonas aeruginosa FARP72 in the intestine of yellowtail catfish, Pangasius pangasius

Abstract

Adhesion is recognized as the first important step of a probiont for intestinal colonization. This study assessed the ability of an antagonistic Pseudomonas aeruginosa FARP72 to adhere and colonize the intestine of yellowtail catfish, Pangasius pangasius both in vitro and in vivo. For the in vitro assay, the whole intestines of each of two starved P. pangasius were introduced separately into tubes containing bluish-green pigment-producing P. aeruginosa FARP72 at 8.00 log10 CFU/mL and physiological saline (0.85% sodium chloride) and incubated for 1 h at 30 ± 1 °C. The homogenate mucus solutions from the intestine samples were serially diluted and plated onto Pseudomonas isolation agar to determine the counts of bluish-green pigment-producing P. aeruginosa (BPPAC). The difference between the numbers of BPPAC and presumptive Pseudomonas counts (PPC) in the treated and control intestines was attributed to the adherence of P. aeruginosa FARP72. The levels of BPPAC and PPC in the treated intestines were 6.09 ± 0.59 log10 CFU/g. Similarly, following 30 days of feeding P. pangasius with P. aeruginosa FARP72 supplemented diet, the intestine of catfish recorded the BPPAC of 5.83 ± 0.64 log CFU/g. In control samples, the BPPACs were recorded as < 3.00 log10 CFU/g. The scanning electron micrograph of the intestines of P. pangasius following the in vitro and in vivo adhesion assays confirmed the ability of this bacterium to strongly adhere to the intestine, thus making it most suitable candidate probiont for use in freshwater catfish aquaculture.

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The data that support the findings of this study are available from the corresponding author upon reasonable request.

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Funding

This research was supported by the Department of Science and Technology (DST), Ministry of Science and Technology, New Delhi, Govt. of India under the scheme "Innovation in Science Pursuit for Inspired Research (INSPIRE)", Fellowship No. IF140455.

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Correspondence to Farhana Hoque.

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Authors of this paper have read and approved the final version submitted. The contents of this manuscript have not been copyrighted or published previously. (1) The contents of this manuscript are not now under consideration for publication elsewhere. (2) The contents of this manuscript will not be copyrighted, submitted, or published elsewhere, while acceptance by the Journal is under consideration. (3) Use of laboratory animals (fish) in the present study has complied with the guidelines and policies of the ethical committee of the Institute.

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Hoque, F., Abraham, T.J. Adhesion and colonization of potential probiont Pseudomonas aeruginosa FARP72 in the intestine of yellowtail catfish, Pangasius pangasius. Arch Microbiol (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00203-021-02188-8

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Keywords

  • Catfish aquaculture
  • Antagonistic bacteria
  • Pseudomonas aeruginosa
  • Adhesion
  • Probiont