Buffalo dung-inhabiting bacteria enhance the nutrient enrichment of soil and proximate contents of Foeniculum vulgare Mill

Abstract

The present study was aimed to study the effect of bacteria inhabiting in buffalo dung on nutritional properties of soil and plant. Three beneficial bacteria Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter xiangfangensis were isolated from buffalo dung to evaluate for their effects individually as well as in consortium. The combined effect of P. mirabilis and P. aeruginosa showed a significant enhancement in different biological parameters of Foeniculum vulgare such as primary branch (99.32%), secondary branch (98.32%), number of umbels (87.62%), number of umbellets (99.85%), number of seeds (104.94%), grain yield (62.38%), biological yield (35.99%), and harvest index (19.48%). Consortium of these potent bacteria also enhanced proximate constituents such as total ash (49.79%), ether extract (63.06%), crude fibre (48.91%), moisture content (33.40%), dry matter (31.45%), acid insoluble ash (33.20%), and crude protein (40.73%). A highly significant correlation (p ≤ 0.01) was found between nitrogen (r = 0.97), phosphorous (r = 0.95), and potassium (r = 0.97) contents of soil. This research enhances the knowledge of the effect of plant growth-promoting bacteria on nutrient properties of soil and fennel which deliver a new index for healthier use in organic agricultural practices.

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Acknowledgements

The authors are thankful to the Department of Botany and Microbiology, Gurukul Kangri Vishwavidyalaya, Haridwar for providing all the necessary facilities to conduct the current research.

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SD performed all the experiments. DKM corrected and finalized the manuscript. NB helped to revise the manuscript before submission.

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Correspondence to Sandhya Dhiman.

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Communicated by Erko Stackebrandt .

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Dhiman, S., Baliyan, N. & Maheshwari, D.K. Buffalo dung-inhabiting bacteria enhance the nutrient enrichment of soil and proximate contents of Foeniculum vulgare Mill. Arch Microbiol (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00203-020-01969-x

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Keywords

  • Buffalo dung
  • Plant parameters
  • Proximate complete analysis
  • Soil correlation