Amelioration effect of salt-tolerant plant growth-promoting bacteria on growth and physiological properties of rice (Oryza sativa) under salt-stressed conditions

Abstract

For sustainable agriculture in saline soil, extensive exploitation of salt-tolerant plant growth-promoting (PGP) bacteria and other symbiotic bacteria is required. This study was carried out to evaluate the efficiency of native salt-tolerant rice rhizobacteria for plant growth promotion under salt stress. A total of 188 bacteria were screened for assessing salt-tolerant capacity and nine isolates tolerating 12% NaCl (w/v) concentration were selected. Biochemical and molecular identification revealed that the salt-tolerant bacteria belonged to Bacillus sp, Exiguobacterium sp, Enterobacter sp, Lysinibacillus sp, Stenotrophomonas sp, Microbacterium sp, and Achromobacter sp. The increase in NaCl concentration from 2 to 4% decreases the PGP activities such as IAA production, P solubilization, K solubilization, and nitrate reduction. The effects of inoculation of salt-tolerant bacteria on the growth and different physiological properties of rice (Oryza sativa) were studied. It was found that the salinity affected the root and shoot length of the control plants; however, bacterial inoculant were found to effectively promote the growth of paddy under salinity stress. Further, bacterial inoculants substantially enhanced total chlorophyll, proline, total phenol, and oxidative damage such as electrolyte leakage and membrane stability index under salt stress. This study suggests that salt-tolerant PGP bacteria may be used for cultivation of O. sativa in salinized agricultural lands.

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Acknowledgements

The authors thank UTU management and Director, CGBIBT, for constant support and providing necessary facilities to carry out the work. The authors also thank GSBTM for 16S rRNA gene sequencing and Mahuva Sugar Factory, Mahuva, for physicochemical studies.

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Correspondence to Natarajan Amaresan.

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Prittesh, P., Avnika, P., Kinjal, P. et al. Amelioration effect of salt-tolerant plant growth-promoting bacteria on growth and physiological properties of rice (Oryza sativa) under salt-stressed conditions. Arch Microbiol (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00203-020-01962-4

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Keywords

  • Salinity
  • Synergism
  • Rice
  • Chlorophyll
  • Plant growth promotion