Marine Microbial Response to Heavy Metals: Mechanism, Implications and Future Prospect

Abstract

Growing levels of pollution in marine environment has been a matter of serious concern in recent years. Increased levels of heavy metals due to improper waste disposal has led to serious repercussions. This has increased occurrences of heavy metals in marine fauna. Marine microbes are large influencers of nutrient cycling and productivity in oceans. Marine bacteria show altered metabolism as a strategy against metal induced stress. Understanding these strategies used to avoid toxic effects of heavy metals can help in devising novel biotechnological applications for ocean clean-up. Using biological tools for remediation has advantages as it does not involve harmful chemicals and it shows greater flexibility to environmental fluctuations. This review provides a comprehensive insight on marine microbial response to heavy metals and sheds light on existing knowledge about and paves for new avenues in research for bioremediation strategies.

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Adapted from Nies 1999)

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Adapted from Nies 1999)

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Adapted from Nies 1999)

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(Adapted from Ramírez-Díaz et al. 2008)

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Acknowledgements

Authors are grateful to Director, CSIR-National Institute of Oceanography (CSIR-NIO), Goa, India and Scientist-in-Charge, CSIR-NIO, Regional Centre, Mumbai for their encouragement and support. This is the CSIR-NIO contribution number 6551.

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Correspondence to Abhay B. Fulke.

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Fulke, A.B., Kotian, A. & Giripunje, M.D. Marine Microbial Response to Heavy Metals: Mechanism, Implications and Future Prospect. Bull Environ Contam Toxicol (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00128-020-02923-9

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Keywords

  • Heavy metals
  • Marine microbes
  • Bioremediation
  • Ocean clean-up