Mapping and identification of CsSh5.1, a gene encoding a xyloglucan galactosyltransferase required for hypocotyl elongation in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.)

Abstract

Key message

CsSh5.1, which controls hypocotyl elongation under high temperature conditions in cucumber, was mapped to a 57.1 kb region on chromosome 5 containing a candidate gene encoding a xyloglucan galactosyltransferase.

Abstract

Hypocotyl growth is a vital process in seedling establishment. Hypocotyl elongation after germination relies more on longitudinal cell elongation than cell division. Cell elongation is largely determined by the extensibility of the cell wall. Here, we identified a spontaneous mutant in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.), sh5.1, which exhibits a temperature-insensitive short hypocotyl phenotype. Genetic analysis showed that the phenotype of sh5.1 was controlled by a recessive nuclear gene. CsSh5.1 was mapped to a 57.1 kb interval on chromosome 5, containing eight predicted genes. Sequencing analysis revealed that the Csa5G171710 is the candidate gene of CsSh5.1, which was further confirmed via co-segregation analysis and genomic DNA sequencing in natural cucumber variations. The result indicated that hypocotyl elongation might be controlled by this gene. CsSh5.1 encodes a xyloglucan galactosyltransferase that specifically adds galactose to xyloglucan and forms galactosylated xyloglucans, which determine the strength and extensibility of the cell walls. CsSh5.1 expression in wild-type (WT) hypocotyl was significantly higher than that in sh5.1 hypocotyl under high temperature, suggesting its important role in hypocotyl cell elongation under high temperature. The identification of CsSh5.1 is helpful for elucidating the function of xyloglucan galactosyltransferase in cell wall expansion and understanding the mechanism of hypocotyl elongation in cucumber.

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Acknowledgements

We thank Lihuang Zhu (Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences) for affording technical support for the experiment. This study was supported by the Project of Science and Technology Commission of Shanghai Municipality (18391900300), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (no. 31672173), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (31972425), and. the Agri-X Interdisciplinary Fund of Shanghai Jiao Tong Univerity (Agri-X2017011).

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KZ performed experiments and finished the writing of the manuscript. SP founded our experiments. YW contributed to the extraction of DNA of F2 plants. YC contributed to the data analysis. HD and JS contributed to the manufacture of polyacrylamide gel. HW, and VL contributed to the writing of this paper. HH contributed to taking care of the plants. HW contributed to the offering good advisements in the process of experiments. GW contributed to taking clear pictures and manuscript development. GW and RC, the corresponding authors, supervised all the process of experiments, put forward the overall ideas.

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Correspondence to Gang Wang or Run Cai.

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Zhang, K., Pan, J., Chen, Y. et al. Mapping and identification of CsSh5.1, a gene encoding a xyloglucan galactosyltransferase required for hypocotyl elongation in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.). Theor Appl Genet (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00122-020-03754-2

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