Theoretical and Applied Genetics

, Volume 131, Issue 5, pp 1145–1152 | Cite as

Characterization of Pm59, a novel powdery mildew resistance gene in Afghanistan wheat landrace PI 181356

  • Chengcheng Tan
  • Genqiao Li
  • Christina Cowger
  • Brett F. Carver
  • Xiangyang Xu
Original Article
  • 213 Downloads

Abstract

Key message

A new powdery mildew resistance gene, designated Pm59, was identified in Afghanistan wheat landrace PI 181356, and mapped in the terminal region of the long arm of chromosome 7A.

Abstract

Powdery mildew, caused by Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici (Bgt), is an important foliar disease of wheat worldwide. In the Great Plains of the USA, Bgt isolates virulent to widely used powdery mildew resistance genes, such as Pm3a, were previously identified. The objectives of this study were to characterize the powdery mildew resistance gene in Afghanistan landrace PI 181356, which exhibited high resistance to Bgt isolates collected in southern Great Plains, and identify molecular markers for marker-assisted selection. An F2 population and F2:3 lines derived from a cross between PI 181356 and OK1059060-126135-3 were used in this study. Genetic analysis indicated that PI 181356 carries a single dominant gene, designated Pm59, in the terminal region of the long arm of chromosome 7A. Pm59 was mapped to an interval between sequence tag site (STS) markers Xmag1759 and Xmag1714 with genetic distances of 0.4 cM distal to Xmag1759 and 5.7 cM proximal to Xmag1714. Physical mapping suggested that Pm59 is in the distal bin 7AL 0.99–1.00. Pm59 is a novel powdery mildew resistance gene, and confers resistance to Bgt isolates collected from the Great Plains and the state of Montana. Therefore, Pm59 can be used to breed powdery mildew-resistant cultivars in these regions. Xmag1759 is ideal for marker-assisted selection of Pm59 in wheat breeding.

Abbreviations

Bgt

Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici

cM

Centimorgan

Pm gene

Powdery mildew resistance gene

STS

Sequence tag site

SSR

Simple sequence repeat

Notes

Acknowledgements

We thank Dr. Robert McIntosh of Sydney University for reviewing this paper. Mention of trade names or commercial products in this publication is solely for the purpose of providing specific information and does not imply recommendation or endorsement by the USDA. The USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

On behalf of all authors, the corresponding author states that there is no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© This is a U.S. Government work and not under copyright protection in the US; foreign copyright protection may apply 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Wheat, Peanut, and Other Field Crops Research UnitUSDA-ARSStillwaterUSA
  2. 2.Plant and Soil Science DepartmentOklahoma State UniversityStillwaterUSA
  3. 3.Plant Science Research UnitUSDA-ARSRaleighUSA

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