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QTLs for branching, floret formation, and pre-flowering floret abortion of rice panicle in a temperate japonica × tropical japonica cross

Abstract

A large panicle with numerous florets is essential for improving rice (Oryza sativa L.) yield. Rice panicle size is determined by such underlying morphogenetic processes as: (1) primary branch formation on the panicle axis; (2) floret formation on the primary branches (mainly determined by the secondary branch formation); and (3) pre-flowering abortion of florets in the panicle. We examined QTLs for these processes to understand how they are integrated into panicle size. We developed 106 backcross-inbred lines (BC1F4) from a cross between ‘Akihikari’ (a temperate japonica) and ‘IRAT109’ (a tropical japonica) and constructed a genetic map. One QTL detected on chromosome 2, with a large effect (R=0.30) on the number of florets per panicle, affected both primary branch formation on the panicle axis and floret formation on the primary branches. In addition, three QTLs that affect only one of these two processes were identified on chromosomes 4, 9, and 11, each having a subsidiary effect on the number of florets per panicle (R2=0.04–0.07). QTLs for pre-flowering floret abortion were detected at three different regions of the genome (chromosomes 1, 10, and 11). This is the first report on QTLs for pre-flowering floret abortion in grasses. The absence of a co-location between QTLs suggests that floret formation and abortion are not directly linked causally. These results demonstrate that studying the partitioning of panicle size into these underlying morphogenetic components would be helpful in understanding the complicated genetic control of panicle size.

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Acknowledgements

We thank Prof. Yasuo Ukai and Dr. Hiroshi Omori (The University of Tokyo) for their kind guidance for data analysis; Dr. Hideshi Yasui (Kyushu University) and Dr. Masahiro Yano (National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences) for their valuable suggestions on BIL development; Prof. Tadanobu Maeda (Utsunomiya University) for his kind help in field studies; Mr. Noboru Washizu, Mr. Ken-ichiro Ichikawa, Ms. Shizue Nakada and Mr. Hiroshi Kimura (The University of Tokyo) for their technical assistance in field management; and Mrs. Mitsuko Konno (The University of Tokyo) for her technical support. This work was supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (No.13556004 and No.15380013 to K.N.) the Ministry of Education, Science, Sports and Culture, Japan.

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Correspondence to K. Nemoto.

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Communicated by D. J. Mackill

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Yamagishi, J., Miyamoto, N., Hirotsu, S. et al. QTLs for branching, floret formation, and pre-flowering floret abortion of rice panicle in a temperate japonica × tropical japonica cross. Theor Appl Genet 109, 1555–1561 (2004). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00122-004-1795-5

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Keywords

  • Simple Sequence Repeat Marker
  • Primary Branch
  • Tropical Japonica
  • Sink Capacity
  • Temperate Japonica