Mitochondrial dynamics, positioning and function mediated by cytoskeletal interactions

Abstract

The ability of a mitochondrion to undergo fission and fusion, and to be transported and localized within a cell are central not just to proper functioning of mitochondria, but also to that of the cell. The cytoskeletal filaments, namely microtubules, F-actin and intermediate filaments, have emerged as prime movers in these dynamic mitochondrial shape and position transitions. In this review, we explore the complex relationship between the cytoskeleton and the mitochondrion, by delving into: (i) how the cytoskeleton helps shape mitochondria via fission and fusion events, (ii) how the cytoskeleton facilitates the translocation and anchoring of mitochondria with the activity of motor proteins, and (iii) how these changes in form and position of mitochondria translate into functioning of the cell.

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Acknowledgements

We thank N. A. Tirumala and H. Kumar for constructive comments on the manuscript.

Funding

VA was supported by extramural funding from the Welcome Trust/Department of Biotechnology–India Alliance (grant IA/18/1/503607), the Women Excellence Award from the Science and Engineering Research Board, India, intramural funding from the Indian Institute of Science, and the RI Mazumdar Young Investigator Award.

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Shah, M., Chacko, L.A., Joseph, J.P. et al. Mitochondrial dynamics, positioning and function mediated by cytoskeletal interactions. Cell. Mol. Life Sci. (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00018-021-03762-5

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Keywords

  • Mitochondrial dynamics
  • Cytoskeleton
  • Microtubules
  • Molecular motors
  • Mitochondria