The role of SIRT3-mediated mitochondrial homeostasis in osteoarthritis

Abstract

Osteoarthritis is the most common degenerative joint disease and causes major pain and disability in adults. It has been reported that mitochondrial dysfunction in chondrocytes is associated with osteoarthritis. Sirtuins are a family of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent histone deacetylases that have the ability to deacetylate protein targets and play an important role in the regulation of cell physiological and pathological processes. Among sirtuin family members, sirtuin 3, which is mainly located in mitochondria, can exert its deacetylation activity to regulate mitochondrial function, regeneration, and dynamics; these processes are presently recognized to maintain redox homeostasis to prevent oxidative stress in cell metabolism. In this review, we provide present opinions on the effect of mitochondrial dysfunction in osteoarthritis. Furthermore, the potential protective mechanism of SIRT3-mediated mitochondrial homeostasis in the progression of osteoarthritis is discussed.

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Acknowledgements

The authors declare that the research was conducted in the absence of any commercial or financial relationships that could be construed as potential conflicts of interest. This study was supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Zhejiang Province (Grant No. LD19H060001) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 81871793).

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The idea for the manuscript came from YH. ZW, LX, KX, and ZC performed the literature search and data analysis, and KX and ZC, JR and LW critically revised the manuscript. All authors read and approved the final version of the manuscript.

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Correspondence to Jisheng Ran or Lidong Wu.

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He, Y., Wu, Z., Xu, L. et al. The role of SIRT3-mediated mitochondrial homeostasis in osteoarthritis. Cell. Mol. Life Sci. (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00018-020-03497-9

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Keywords

  • SIRT3
  • Mitochondrion
  • Oxidative stress
  • Osteoarthritis