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Inflammation Research

, Volume 56, Issue 4, pp 168–174 | Cite as

Modified skin window technique for the extended characterisation of acute inflammation in humans

  • D. J. B. Marks
  • M. Radulovic
  • S. McCartney
  • S. Bloom
  • A. W. Segal
Original Research Paper

Abstract.

Objective:

To modify the skin window technique for extended analysis of acute inflammatory responses in humans, and demonstrate its applicability for investigating disease.

Subjects:

15 healthy subjects and 5 Crohn’s patients.

Treatment:

Skin windows, created by dermal abrasion, were overlaid for various durations with filter papers saturated in saline, 100 ng/ml muramyl dipeptide (MDP) or 10 μg/ml interleukin-8 (IL-8).

Methods:

Exuded leukocytes were analyzed by microscopy, immunoblot, DNA-bound transcription factor arrays and RT-PCR. Inflammatory mediators were quantified by ELISA.

Results:

Infiltrating leukocytes were predominantly neutrophils. Numerous secreted mediators were detectable. MDP and IL-8 enhanced responses. Many signalling proteins were phosphorylated with differential patterns in Crohn’s patients, notably PKC α/β hyperphosphorylation (11.3 ± 3.1 vs 1.2 ± 0.9 units, P < 0.02). Activities of 44 transcription factors were detectable, and sufficient RNA isolated for expression analysis of over 400 genes.

Conclusions:

The modifications enable broad characterisation of inflammatory responses and administration of exogenous immunomodulators.

Keywords:

IBD Human inflammation models Skin inflammation and models Intracellular signalling Inflammatory mediators 

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Copyright information

© Birkhäuser Verlag, Basel 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. J. B. Marks
    • 1
  • M. Radulovic
    • 1
  • S. McCartney
    • 2
  • S. Bloom
    • 2
  • A. W. Segal
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of MedicineUniversity College LondonLondonUK
  2. 2.Department of GastroenterologyUniversity College London Hospitals NHS Foundation TrustLondonUK

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