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Photosynthetica

, Volume 42, Issue 4, pp 493–503 | Cite as

Photosynthetic and morphological functional types from different steppe communities in Inner Mongolia, North China

  • R. Z. Wang
Article

Abstract

Morphological functional types and photosynthetic pathway types were identified for the forage species from steppe communities in Inner Mongolia, China, using the data of both field survey and published papers. Seven typical steppe communities were selected to investigate the morphological functional type and photosynthetic pathway type compositions and plant functional type (PFT) diversity in steppe communities at regional scale. Morphological functional types, based on plant height and leaf type combined with life span, were optimal for comparing the community differences in the region, while photosynthetic pathway types were fairly coarse for such studies. Of the seven morphological functional types in the steppe communities, perennial forbs (PEF) were the dominant type, and 60 % of species belonged to this type. Each of the high perennial grass (HPG), short perennial grass (SPG), and annual grass (ANG) types represented less than 10 % of the total, even though the grass species were dominant in the seven steppe communities. The differences of PFTs between the steppe communities were remarkable, and the PFT richness and diversity increased from the communities with moist conditions to the ones with dry environments.

Additional key words

C3, C4, and CAM plants morphology photosynthetic pathway plant diversity plant functional types 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Z. Wang
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Quantitative Vegetation Ecology, Institute of Botanythe Chinese Academy of SciencesBeijingChina

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