Advertisement

European Radiology

, Volume 9, Supplement 3, pp S364–S367 | Cite as

Wideband harmonic imaging: A novel contrast ultrasound imaging technique

  • A. Bauer
  • P. Hauff
  • J. Lazenby
  • P. von Behren
  • M. Zomack
  • M. Reinhardt
  • R. Schlief
US contrast agents and analysis of flows

Abstract.

A novel ultrasonic imaging method, wideband harmonic imaging, for nonlinear imaging of microbubble contrast agents is evaluated. In wideband harmonic mode, two pulses of alternate phase are send out. The image is then processed from the sum of both pulses, resulting in an image of nonlinear scatterers such as microbubbles. A prototype ultrasound system, Siemens Elegra, was evaluated with in vitro investigations and animal trials, using conventional, harmonic and wideband harmonic settings with the galactose based ultrasound contrast agent Levovist. Wideband harmonic imaging offers superior sensitivity for ultrasound contrast agents compared to conventional imaging and harmonic imaging. At low transmit power settings (MI 0.1–0.5) the nonlinear response is already sufficient to generate a image of the blood pool distribution of Levovist in the rabbit kidney including the microvasculature, with clear delineation of vessels and perfused parenchyma. At high transmit amplitudes, nonlinear tissue response reduced the apparent image contrast between contrast agent and tissue. The results suggest that wideband harmonic imaging is currently the most sensitive contrast imaging technique, maintaining highest spatial resolution. This may add to image quality and offer new clinical potential for the use of ultrasound contrast agents such as Levovist.

Keywords

Sensitive Contrast Ultrasound Contrast Agent Harmonic Imaging Harmonic Mode Microbubble Contrast Agent 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Bauer
    • 1
  • P. Hauff
    • 1
  • J. Lazenby
    • 2
  • P. von Behren
    • 2
  • M. Zomack
    • 1
  • M. Reinhardt
    • 1
  • R. Schlief
    • 1
  1. 1.Schering AG, Clinical Development Diagnostics, D-13342 Berlin, GermanyDE
  2. 2.Siemens Medical Systems, Issaquah, WA, USAUS

Personalised recommendations