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European Journal of Pediatrics

, Volume 159, Issue 12, pp 892–894 | Cite as

Genetic and long-term data on a patient with permanent isolated proximal renal tubular acidosis

  • Masaaki Shiohara
  • Takashi Igarashi
  • Tetsuo Mori
  • Atsushi Komiyama
ORIGINAL PAPER

Abstract

A 12-year-old girl presented with permanent isolated proximal renal tubular acidosis (pRTA), glaucoma, band keratopathy, mild cataract and short stature. Severe metabolic acidosis was caused by the impairment of bicarbonate reabsorption in the proximal tubules and alkali therapy improved her acidaemia. A homozygous G to A transition at nucleotide 1,678 in the basolateral kidney type Na+/HCO3 (kNBC) co-transporter gene SLC4A4, which is critical in HCO3 resorption in renal proximal tubules, was identified. Her height and height velocity (HV) were very low (−4.0 SD and −4.4 SD, respectively) before alkali treatment, but both improved after initiating alkali therapy at the age of 2 years and 3 months. The patient's body height and HV were 131.5 cm (−2.7 SD) and 4.0 cm (−2.0 SD), respectively at the age of 12 years.

Conclusion This case demonstrates that early administration of alkali therapy and sustained correction of acidosis, even if inadequate to correct the metabolic acidosis, can markedly improves growth in permanent isolated proximal renal tubular acidosis.

Key words Alkali therapy Growth Permanent isolated proximal renal tubular acidosis 
AbbreviationsHV height velocity NBC bicarbonate transporter pRTA proximal renal tubular acidosis RTA renal tubular acidosis 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Masaaki Shiohara
    • 1
  • Takashi Igarashi
    • 2
  • Tetsuo Mori
    • 1
  • Atsushi Komiyama
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Paediatrics, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1, Asahi, Matsumoto, 390-8621 Japan e-mail: shiohara@hsp.md.shinshu-u.ac.jp Tel.: +81-263-372642; Fax: +81-263-345598JP
  2. 2.Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Mejirodai Campus, 3-28-6 Mejirodai, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 112-8688, JapanJP

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