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The Psychological Record

, Volume 42, Issue 3, pp 389–411 | Cite as

The Differential Outcomes Effect

  • Susan Goeters
  • Elbert Blakely
  • Alan Poling
Article

Abstract

The differential outcomes effect refers specifically to the increase in speed of acquisition or terminal accuracy that occurs in discrimination training when each of two or more discriminative stimuli is correlated with a particular outcome (e.g., type of reinforcer). The present review summarizes studies concerned with the differential outcomes effect, provides a behavioral analysis of the phenomenon in terms of operant-respondent interactions, and offers suggestions for future research.

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Copyright information

© Association of Behavior Analysis International 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susan Goeters
    • 1
  • Elbert Blakely
    • 1
  • Alan Poling
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyWestern Michigan UniversityKalamazooUSA

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