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The Psychological Record

, Volume 40, Issue 2, pp 273–288 | Cite as

An Examination of Modern Psychology Through Two Philosophies of Knowledge

  • Michael H. McLarty
Articles

Abstract

Plato was one of the world’s greatest thinkers. The philosophy of knowledge that he formulated has dominated Western thought for about 2,400 years. This article will suggest that Einstein’s philosophy of knowledge, which includes Plato’s philosophy as a limited case, may help us better understand the fundamental problems in modern psychology.

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Copyright information

© Association of Behavior Analysis International 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael H. McLarty
    • 1
  1. 1.Brown ChapelArkansas CollegeBatesvilleUSA

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