Journal of Poetry Therapy

, Volume 10, Issue 4, pp 245–250 | Cite as

The Use of Poetry in Death-of-a-Child Grief Training for Medical Professionals

  • Cynthia Blomquist Gustavson
Article
  • 2 Downloads

Abstract

This article outlines the use of poetry in a grief-training session for medical professionals. Poetry is used to sensitize and draw forth participants’ feelings they might encounter in the medical field when dealing with the death of children.

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References

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cynthia Blomquist Gustavson
    • 1
  1. 1.TulsaUSA

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