Journal of Poetry Therapy

, Volume 10, Issue 1, pp 27–30 | Cite as

What’s in a Daughter’s Name? A Poem for a Child with the Madonna’s Name

  • Cora L. Díaz de Chumaceiro
Article
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Abstract

Lullaby poems with the name of Mary, mother of Jesus, given to a child’s name are unusual Even rarer are children named after such poems. An overlooked case in the psychoanalytic literature in which Beer-Hofmanns poem, Schlaflied für Miriam, served as the basis for the naming of a child born in New York, of European parents, is briefly underscored.

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References

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cora L. Díaz de Chumaceiro
    • 1
  1. 1.Clinical Psychologist residing in CaracasVenezuela

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